Definition of “excess” - English Dictionary

“excess” in British English

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excessnoun

uk /ɪkˈses/ /ˈek.ses/ us /ɪkˈses/ /ˈek.ses/

excess noun (TOO MUCH)

C1 [ S or U ] an amount that is more than acceptable, expected, or reasonable:

An excess of enthusiasm is not always a good thing.
They both eat to excess (= too much).
There will be an increase in tax for those earning in excess of (= more than) twice the national average wage.
excesses [ plural ]

actions far past the limit of what is acceptable:

For many years people were trying to escape the excesses (= cruel actions) of the junta.
As for shoes, her excesses (= the large number she owned) were well known.

More examples

excessadjective [ before noun ]

uk /ˈek.ses/ us /ˈek.ses/

(Definition of “excess” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“excess” in American English

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excessnoun [ U ]

us /ɪkˈses, ˈek·ses/

an amount that is more than acceptable, expected, or reasonable:

They both eat to excess (= a lot more than they need).
The company’s losses are in excess of (= more than) $5 million.
excessive
adjective us /ɪkˈses·ɪv/

We felt the charges were excessive.

excessadjective [ not gradable ]

us /ɪkˈses, ˈek·ses/

more than is necessary; too much:

excess baggage

(Definition of “excess” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“excess” in Business English

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excessnoun

uk /ɪkˈses/ us

[ S or U ] an amount that is more than is needed, expected, or acceptable:

If you retire having saved more than £1.4m you will face a one-off 33% tax charge on the excess.
excess of sth There is still, in many industries, an excess of productive capacity.

[ S ] UK US deductible INSURANCE a part of the cost of an accident, injury, etc. that you agree to pay yourself when you buy insurance:

Cover would cost £239 a year with a £75 excess, or £215 a year with a £250 excess.
excess on sth The policy carries a £40 excess on most claims.
in excess of

more than:

Last year he earned in excess of $3 million.
The Fund will not borrow money in excess of one-third of the value of its net assets.

excessadjective [ before noun ]

uk /ɪkˈses/ us

more than is needed, expected, or acceptable:

Rents may be lower than ownership costs, meaning renters can invest the excess cash.
The machine can generate electricity using excess heat that would otherwise be wasted.

(Definition of “excess” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)