exploit Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “exploit” - English Dictionary

Definition of "exploit" - American English Dictionary

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exploitnoun [C]

 us   /ˈek·splɔɪt/
a ​brave, ​interesting, or ​unusualact: daredevil exploits He is not ​content to ​limit himself to his exploits on the ​basketballcourt.

exploitverb [T]

 us   /ɪkˈsplɔɪt/

exploit verb [T] (USE WELL)

to use something for ​your own ​benefit: The two ​companiesjoinedforces to exploit the ​potential of the ​Internet.

exploit verb [T] (USE UNFAIRLY)

to use someone ​unfairly for ​your own ​advantage: Factories here are coming under ​criticism for exploiting ​workers.
(Definition of exploit from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "exploit" - British English Dictionary

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exploitverb [T]

uk   us   /ɪkˈsplɔɪt/

exploit verb [T] (USE WELL)

B2 to use something in a way that ​helps you: We need to make ​sure that we exploit ​our resources as ​fully as ​possible.
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exploit verb [T] (USE UNFAIRLY)

B2 to use someone or something ​unfairly for ​your own ​advantage: Laws ​exist to ​stopcompanies exploiting ​theiremployees.
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exploitable
adjective uk   /-ˈsplɔɪ.tə.bl̩/  us   /-ˈsplɔɪ.t̬ə.bl̩/
The ​coal mine is no ​longercommercially exploitable (= can no ​longer be used for ​profit). The ​lack of ​jobs in this ​areameans that the ​workforce is ​easily exploitable (= ​employers can use ​workersunfairly for ​their own ​advantage).

exploitnoun [C usually plural]

uk   us   /ˈek.splɔɪt/
something ​unusual, ​brave, or ​funny that someone has done: She was ​telling me about her exploits while ​travelling around ​Africa.
(Definition of exploit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "exploit" - Business English Dictionary

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exploitverb [T]

uk   us   /ɪkˈsplɔɪt/
to use or ​develop something for ​profit or ​progress in ​business: exploit resources/technology/information We need to make sure that we exploit our ​resources as fully as possible. exploit ​opportunities/​potential This ​collection of ​valuablesound recordings has never been commercially exploited.
disapproving to ​treat someone ​unfairly in ​order to make ​money or get an ​advantage: Laws exist to ​stopcompanies exploiting their ​employees. These unfortunate ​people have been ruthlessly exploited.
often disapproving to use something, often ​unfairly, for your own ​advantage: exploit a loophole/weakness/vulnerability These are ​responsibleemployers who are not ​seeking to exploit ​loopholes in the ​legislation. People exploit the ​system by ​lodgingmultipleappeals.
exploitable
adjective /ɪkˈsplɔɪtəbl̩/  us /-ṱə-/
The coal mine is no ​longercommercially exploitable.
(Definition of exploit from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“exploit” in Business English

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