Definition of “expropriate” - English Dictionary

“expropriate” in British English

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expropriateverb [ T ]

uk /ɪkˈsprəʊ.pri.eɪt/ us /ɪkˈsproʊ.pri.eɪt/ formal
expropriation
noun [ C or U ] uk /ɪkˌsprəʊ.priˈeɪ.ʃən/ us /ɪkˌsproʊ.priˈeɪ.ʃən/
expropriator
noun [ C ] uk /ɪkˈsprəʊ.pri.eɪ.tər/ us /ɪkˈsproʊ.pri.eɪ.t̬ɚ/

(Definition of “expropriate” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“expropriate” in American English

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expropriateverb [ T ]

us /ekˈsproʊ·priˌeɪt/

to take and keep money or property belonging to someone else

(Definition of “expropriate” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“expropriate” in Business English

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expropriateverb [ T ]

uk /ɪkˈsprəʊprieɪt/ us /-ˈsproʊ-/

LAW, GOVERNMENT if a government expropriates property, it takes it for public use, sometimes without payment to the owner:

The new regime wiped out organized crime and vice, expropriated factories and built new ones, setting the city on a new industrial course.
Political risk is the risk that an investment abroad may be expropriated by the overseas government.
The road will be built on about 400 acres, of which 56 acres were expropriated from landowners.

LAW to illegally take property or money that belongs to someone else:

The banker has been in jail since mid-May pending trial on charges of expropriating deposits.
expropriation
noun [ C or U ] /ɪkˌsprəʊpriˈeɪʃən/ /-ˌsproʊ-/

Farmers have been given the right to sue to protect their land against expropriation.

(Definition of “expropriate” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)