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Definition of “fair” - English Dictionary

"fair" in American English

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fairadjective

 us   /feər/
  • fair adjective (RIGHT)

[-er/-est only] treating someone in a way that is ​right or ​reasonable, or ​treatingpeopleequally and not ​allowingpersonalopinions to ​influenceyourjudgment: All he ​asks is a fair ​chance to ​prove his ​innocence. I’m ​willing to do my fair ​share of the ​work (= ​equalpart).
[-er/-est only] If a ​game or ​competition is fair, it is done ​according to the ​rules: It was a fair ​fight.
[-er/-est only] In some ​sports, esp. ​baseball, fair ​means within the ​playingfield: The ​umpireruled it a fair ​ball.
  • fair adjective (AVERAGE)

[not gradable] neither very good ​nor very ​bad: He’s good in ​physics but only fair in ​math.
  • fair adjective (LARGE)

[not gradable] large or ​great in ​comparison: We still had a fair ​amount of ​foreignmoney when we ​returned.
  • fair adjective (CORRECT)

[not gradable] likely to be ​correct; ​accurate: The architect’s ​drawing will give you a ​pretty fair ​idea of what the ​completedhouse will ​look like.
  • fair adjective (WEATHER)

[-er/-est only] (of ​weather) ​pleasant and ​dry
  • fair adjective (PALE)

[-er/-est only] (of ​skin) ​pale, or (of ​hair) ​light in ​color: If you have fair ​skin, you’ll get a ​sunburneasily.

fairnoun [C]

 us   /fer, fær/
  • fair noun [C] (PUBLIC EVENT)

a ​publicevent, usually ​heldoutside, where ​goods and sometimes ​farmanimals are ​shown and ​sold and where there is often ​food and ​entertainment
county/state fair
A ​county/​state fair is one where ​farmanimals and ​products from that ​region are ​shown to ​compete for ​prizes and there is ​food and ​entertainment.
street fair
A ​street fair is one where a ​citystreet is ​closed to ​cars so that ​goods and ​food can be ​sold to ​peoplewalking through it.
A fair is also a show at which ​people who ​work in a ​particularindustrymeet to ​sell and ​advertisetheirproducts: a ​book/​antiques/​toy fair
(Definition of fair from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"fair" in British English

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fairadjective

uk   /feər/  us   /fer/
  • fair adjective (RIGHT)

B1 treating someone in a way that is ​right or ​reasonable, or ​treating a ​group of ​peopleequally and not ​allowingpersonalopinions to ​influenceyourjudgment: a fair ​trial Why should I have to do all the ​cleaning? It's not fair! It's not fair on Joe (= it is not ​right) to make him do all the ​work! It's not fair that she's ​allowed to go and I'm not! It's not fair toblame me for everything! She's scrupulously fair with all her ​employees (= she ​treats them all ​equally).UK She ​claims her ​article was a fair comment on (= a ​reasonable thing to say about) a ​matter of ​publicinterest. He ​offered to do all the ​cleaning if I did all the ​cooking, which ​seemed like a fair (= ​reasonable) deal.
B1 If something is fair, it is ​reasonable and is what you ​expect or ​deserve: I ​thought it was a fair price that she was ​offering. I'm ​willing to do my fair (= ​equal) share of the ​work. All the ​workerswant is a fair wage for the ​work that they do.
If a ​game or ​competition is fair, it is done ​according to the ​rules: It was a fair ​fight.
it's only fair
it is the ​right way to ​treat someone and what they ​deserve: I ​think it's only fair to ​tell you that we have had over 300 ​applications for this ​job.
it's fair to say
it is ​true to say: I ​think it's fair to say (that) you've done less of the ​work than I have.
to be fair
considering everything that has an ​effect on a ​situation, so that a fair ​judgment can be made: He's done the ​jobbadly but, to be fair, I gave him very little ​time to do it.
fair enough B2 UK informal
something you say to show that you ​understand why someone has done or said something: "I'm just ​annoyed with him because he's ​behaved so ​badly." "Fair enough."
fair's fair (UK also fair dos) informal
something that you say when you ​want someone to ​behavereasonably or ​treat you the same as other ​people: Come on, it's my ​turn. Fair's fair!
a fair hearing
an ​opportunity to ​explain something or give ​youropinions, without other ​peopletrying to ​influence the ​situation: He didn't ​think that he got a fair ​hearing in ​court.
fair and square
in an ​honest way and without any ​doubt: We ​won the ​match fair and ​square.
UK (US squarely) If you ​hit someone fair and ​square on a ​particularpart of ​theirbody, you ​hit that ​person hard, ​exactly on that ​part: He ​hit me fair and ​square on the ​nose.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • fair adjective (PALE)

A2 (of ​skin) ​pale, or (of ​hair) ​paleyellow or ​gold: She's got fair ​hair and ​blueeyes. a fair ​complexion My ​sister has ​darkhair but my brother's fair (= he has fair ​hair). He's fair-haired. All my ​family are fair-​skinned.
  • fair adjective (QUITE LARGE)

C2 [before noun] quitelarge: We've had a fair amount of ​rain this ​week. We've had a fair number of ​applicants. It's a fair-​sizedgarden. We've come a ​long way, but there's still a fair way (= ​quite a ​longdistance) to go.

fairnoun [C]

uk   /feər/  us   /fer/
a ​largepublicevent where ​goods are ​bought and ​sold, usually from ​tables that have been ​speciallyarranged for the ​event, and where there is often ​entertainment: I ​bought a ​woodensaladbowl at the ​local craft fair.
B1 (UK also funfair, US also carnival) an ​outsideevent where you can ​ride on ​largemachines for ​pleasure and ​playgames to ​winprizes
C1 a ​large show at which ​people who ​work in a ​particularindustrymeet, and ​sell and ​advertisetheirproducts: a ​book/​antiques/​toy fair a ​trade fair
a ​publicevent in the ​countryside where ​farmanimals and ​farmproducts are ​sold: US a ​county/​state fairUK a ​cattle/​agricultural fair
(UK also fete) a ​publicevent, often ​heldoutside, where you can take ​part in competitions and ​buysmall things and ​food, often ​organized to ​collectmoney for a ​particularpurpose: the ​school fair
(Definition of fair from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"fair" in Business English

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fairadjective

uk   us   /feər/ SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
treatingpeople equally and in a way that is ​right and ​reasonable: It's the government's ​job to make sure that the ​taxsystem is fair and ​equitable.be fair on sb The new ​regulations are not fair on ​workingparents. Everyone has the ​right to a fair ​trial. Corporations must ​pay their fair ​share of the ​cost of the ​constructionwork.
a fair ​price, ​wage, ​rent, etc. is not too high or too ​low: All we're ​asking for is a fair ​wage. Local ​growers must be given a fair ​price for their ​produce.

fairnoun [C]

uk   us   /feər/
COMMERCE, MARKETING a large ​event at which ​manufacturers, ​businesspeople, and ​individualsadvertise and sometimes ​sell their ​products and ​services: The Battersea Contemporary Art Fair is one of the largest in the UK.
(Definition of fair from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“fair” in Business English

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