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Definition of “feel” - English Dictionary

"feel" in American English

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feelverb

 us   /fil/ (past tense and past participle felt  /felt/ )
  • feel verb (EXPERIENCE)

to ​experience or be ​aware of something ​emotional or ​physical: [L] "How are you feeling?" "Oh, I don’t feel very good." [L] She said she didn’t ​want anyone to feel ​sorry for her. [L] I feel ​comfortable with you, Nick. [L] He felt ​compelled to ​report the ​incident. [T] When the ​anesthesiawore off, I felt a lot of ​pain.
  • feel verb (TOUCH)

[I/T] to ​touch, esp. with the ​fingers, in ​order to ​examine something: [T] Feel the ​softness of the baby’s ​skin. [I] She felt around (= ​searched with her ​hands) for the ​lightswitch.
  • feel verb (HAVE OPINION)

[T] to have as an ​opinion or ​belief: [+ (that) clause] I feel (that) I should be doing more to ​help her.

feelnoun [U]

 us   /fil/
  • feel noun [U] (UNDERSTANDING)

(also feeling,  /ˈfi·lɪŋ/ ) an ​understanding or ​naturalability: Marcia has a good feel for this ​kind of ​work.
  • feel noun [U] (TOUCH)

the way that something feels: I ​love the feel of ​silk against my ​skin.
(Definition of feel from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"feel" in British English

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feelverb

uk   /fiːl/  us   /fiːl/ (felt, felt)
  • feel verb (EXPERIENCE)

A1 [L or T] to ​experience something ​physical or ​emotional: "How are you feeling?" "Not too ​bad, but I've still got a ​slightheadache." How would you feel about ​moving to a different ​city? He's still feeling a little ​weak after his ​operation. My ​eyes feel really ​sore. I never feel ​safe when Richard is ​driving. Never in her ​life had she felt so ​happy. My ​suitcasebegan to feel really ​heavy after a while. I felt like (= ​thought that I was) a ​completeidiot/such a ​fool. She felt his ​hotbreath on her ​neck. [+ obj + -ing verb ] I could feel the ​sweat trickling down my back. By ​midday, we were really feeling (= ​suffering from) the ​heat.
feel like sth
B1 to have a ​wish for something, or to ​want to do something, at a ​particularmoment: I feel like (going for) a ​swim. I feel like (having) a ​nicecoolglass of ​lemonade. "Are you coming to ​aerobics?" "No, I don't feel like it today."
[+ -ing verb] to ​want to do something that you do not do: He was so ​rude I felt like slapping his ​face.
feel the cold
to get ​coldquicker and more often than most ​people: As you get ​older, you ​tend to feel the ​cold more.
not feel a thing informal
to not feel any ​pain: "Did it ​hurt?" "Not at all - I didn't feel a thing."

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  • feel verb (OPINION)

B1 [I or T] to have a ​particularopinion about or ​attitude towards something: [+ (that)] I feel (that) I should be doing more to ​help her. [(+ to be) + adj] He had always felt himself (to be) ​inferior to his ​brothers. Do you feel very ​strongly (= have ​strongopinions) about this? I feel ​certain I'm ​right.

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  • feel verb (TOUCH)

B2 [I or T] to ​touch something in ​order to ​discover something about it: [+ question word] Just feel howcold my ​hands are! He ​gently felt the ​softness of the baby's ​cheek. I was feeling (around) (= ​searching with my ​hand) in my ​bag for the ​keys.

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feelnoun

uk   /fiːl/  us   /fiːl/
  • feel noun (TOUCH)

[S] the way that something feels: She ​loved the feel of ​silk against her ​skin.
[C] mainly UK informal the ​action of ​touching something: Is that ​shirtsilk? Ooh, ​let me have a feel!
  • feel noun (CHARACTER)

[S] (also feeling) the ​character of a ​place or ​situation: I like the ​decoration - it's got a ​Spanish feel to it. There was a feel ofmystery about the ​place. We were there for such a ​shorttime, we didn't really get the feel of (= get to ​know) the ​place.
  • feel noun (UNDERSTANDING)

a feel for sth (also feeling)
a ​naturalunderstanding or ​ability, ​especially in a ​subject or ​activity: She has a ​real feel for ​language. I ​triedlearning the ​piano, but I never had much of a feel for it.
get the feel of sth (also feeling)
to ​learn how to do something, usually a new ​activity: Once you get the feel of it, using a ​mouse is ​easy.
(Definition of feel from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"feel" in Business English

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feelverb [I or T]

uk   us   /fiːl/
to ​experience something ​physical or emotional: Steve's not feeling well so he's not in the ​office today. We want our ​employees to feel good about coming to ​work. In some ​companies, ​workers feel ​pressure to ​worklonghours. How would you feel about speaking at the ​conference?
to have a particular ​opinion: feel (that) I feel that it's ​time to make some ​changes.feel certain (that) I feel ​certain I'm ​right.
feel free
if someone tells you to feel ​free to do something, they ​mean that you can do it if you want to: feel free to do sth Feel ​free to ​email or ​call if you need more details.
feel the pinch
to have problems with ​money because the things you need are too ​expensive or because your ​income has been ​reduced : As ​oilpricesrise, ​manufacturers are ​starting to feel the pinch.
feel strongly about sth
to have a ​strongopinion about something: The ​logo is not something we feel ​strongly about.

feelnoun [S]

uk   us   /fiːl/
the way that something feels: We want our ​restaurants to have a homely feel.
a feel for sth
an ​understanding of something, especially one that you get by ​experiencing something rather than ​learning about it: We are putting ​people on the ​ground to ensure that we are the first to get a feel for what the ​consumerwants.
get the feel of sth
to learn how to do something, usually a new ​activity: Once she got the feel of the ​business, she quickly ​established a ​reputation.
(Definition of feel from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“feel” in Business English

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