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Definition of “flight” - English Dictionary

"flight" in American English

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flightnoun

us   /flɑɪt/
  • flight noun (FLYING)

[C/U] an aircraft trip, or the occasion of being a passenger in an aircraft: [C] We’ll be arriving home on Tuesday on flight 147. [C] All flights out of Midway have been canceled because of bad weather. [C] We had a smooth flight all the way.
[C/U] Flight is also the act or process of flying: [C] We watched a flight of geese (= a group flying together). [U] Some people think that too much money is spent on space flight.
  • flight noun (ESCAPE)

[U] escape from a particular situation, or the act of leaving: their flight from poverty The flight of manufacturers to the South stripped Massachusetts of its factories.
  • flight noun (STAIRS)

[C] a set of stairs connecting one floor and the next in a building or other structure: We had to climb three flights of stairs.
(Definition of flight from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"flight" in British English

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flightnoun

uk   /flaɪt/ us   /flaɪt/
  • flight noun (JOURNEY)

A2 [C] a journey in an aircraft: I'll never forget my first flight. How was your flight? All flights to New York today are delayed because of bad weather. My flight was cancelled.

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  • flight noun (AIRCRAFT)

[C] an aircraft that is making a particular journey: Flight 474 to Buenos Aires is now boarding at Gate 9.

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  • flight noun (MOVEMENT)

[U] an occasion when something flies or moves through the air: an eagle in flight Suddenly the whole flock of geese took flight (= started flying). Modern missiles are so accurate because their flight is controlled by computer.
[C] UK a group of birds, aircraft, etc. flying together: a flight of geese/swans
  • flight noun (ESCAPE)

[U] (an act or example of) escape, running away, or avoiding something: They lost all their possessions during their flight from the invading army.
put sb to flight UK old-fashioned
to defeat someone and force them to run away
take flight
to run away: The burglars took flight when the alarm sounded.

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  • flight noun (SET)

C2 [C] a set of steps or stairs, usually between two floors of a building: We live up three flights of stairs.
specialized food & drink [C] a number of different types of wine, beer, etc. for tasting: Wine bar patrons can sample flights of wine. A wine flight is available to accompany the tasting menu at £ 35 per person.
(Definition of flight from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"flight" in Business English

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flightnoun [C]

uk   /flaɪt/ us  
TRANSPORT a journey in an aircraft: You should leave now or you'll miss your flight.a flight to/from sth She is booked on the 8 a.m. flight to New York.domestic/international flights The company operates eight domestic flights in Finland. scheduled/charter flights The price includes accommodation and return scheduled flights. long-haul/short-haul flights
ECONOMICS a situation in which people or goods move quickly away from a place to escape a bad situation: He added that he didn't think there was a risk of flight of city employees. A return of financial calm to the country should reduce capital flight.
the top flight
people who are at the highest level in a job or business activity: With this movie he joined the top flight of Hollywood directors.
FINANCE companies whose shares are worth the most money: Corporate news was dominated by firms outside the top flight.
(Definition of flight from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“flight” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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