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Definition of “form” - English Dictionary

"form" in American English

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formverb

 us   /fɔrm/
  • form verb (COME TOGETHER)

[I/T] to come together and make a ​particularorder or ​shape: [+ to infinitive] A ​crowd formed to ​watch the ​fire. [T] Please form a ​singleline. [T] The ​geeseflyingoverhead formed a V-shaped ​pattern.
  • form verb (BEGIN HAVING)

[T] to ​begin to have: I formed the ​opinion that I was not really ​welcome there any more.
  • form verb (BEGIN)

[T] to ​begin something, esp. ​organizingpeople or things: We formed a ​communitygroup to ​helppeople who are ​sick or ​disabled. They formed a new ​publishingcompany.

formnoun

  • form noun (TYPE)

 us   /fɔrm/ [C] a ​type or ​kind of something, or the ​particular way in which something ​exists: I was always more ​interested in ​poetry than in other forms of ​literature. She has a ​mild form of the ​flu and should be OK in a few ​days. The ​medicine comes in the form of a ​liquid or ​pills.
  • form noun (SHAPE/APPEARANCE)

 us   /fɔrm/ [C] the ​shape or ​appearance of something: The ​stadium was in the form of a ​circle.
  • form noun (DOCUMENT)

 us   /fɔrm/ [C] something, usually ​paper, that has ​spacesmarked where you ​fill in ​information: Fill out an ​application form and we will ​let you ​know if a ​jobopens up.
  • form noun (ART/MUSIC)

literature /fɔrm/ [C] the ​organization, ​shape, and ​structure of a written ​work art, music /fɔrm/ [C] Form in a ​work of ​art or ​piece of ​music is the ​design or ​arrangement of it that it ​shares with other ​works of the same ​type
  • form noun (BEHAVIOR)

 us   /fɔrm/ [U] the way in which someone does something: He was in ​great form and ​won the ​golftournament by 7 ​strokes.
(Definition of form from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"form" in British English

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formverb

uk   /fɔːm/  us   /fɔːrm/
B2 [I or T] to ​begin to ​exist or to make something ​begin to ​exist: A ​crowd formed around the ​accident. A ​solutionbegan to form in her ​mind. I formed the ​impression (= the way she ​behavedsuggested to me) that she didn't really ​want to come. [T] to make something into a ​particularshape: She formed the ​clay into a ​smallbowl.B1 [L only + noun] to make or be something: The ​lorries formed a ​barricadeacross the ​road. Together they would form the next ​government. This ​information formed the ​basis of the ​report. [I] formal If ​separate things form, they come together to make a ​whole: The ​children formed into ​lines.

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formnoun

uk   /fɔːm/  us   /fɔːrm/
  • form noun (DOCUMENT)

A2 [C] a ​paper or set of ​papersprinted with ​spaces in which ​answers to ​questions can be written or ​information can be ​recorded in an ​organized way: an application form (= ​document used for ​askingofficially for something, for ​example a ​job) an entry form (= ​document used to ​enter a ​competition) Please fill in/out the form with ​blackink. When you have completed the form, ​hand it in at the ​desk.

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  • form noun (TYPE)

B2 [C] a ​type of something: Swimming is the ​best form ofexercise.

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  • form noun (SHAPE)

C1 [C] the ​shape or ​appearance of something: I could just about make out his ​sleeping form on the ​bed. The ​moonhighlighted the ​shadowy forms of the ​hills. The ​lawn was ​laid out in the form of the ​figure eight.take form to ​gradually be ​seen or ​graduallydevelop: Trees and ​hedgesstarted to take form as the ​fogcleared. As they ​chatted, the ​idea of going ​skiing together ​gradually took form.

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  • form noun (ABILITY)

[U] A competitor's form is ​theirability to be ​successful over a ​period of ​time: Both ​horses have ​shown good form over the last ​season. After a ​badyear, she has ​regained her form.be on good, great, etc. form C2 UK (US be in good, great, etc. form) to be ​feeling or ​performing well: Paul was on good form at the ​wedding and ​kept everyone ​entertained.

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  • form noun (GRAMMAR)

B1 [C] specialized language one ​part of a ​verb or other word that has a ​special use or ​meaning: The ​continuous form of "​stand" is "​standing". "Stood" is the ​irregular past ​tense form of "​stand". "Hers" is the ​possessive form of "her". "Isn't" is the ​short form of "is not".

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  • form noun (SCHOOL GROUP)

B1 [C] in the UK, a ​class of ​schoolchildren or a ​group of ​classes of ​children of a ​similarage
  • form noun (SEAT)

[C] old-fashioned a ​long, ​thinseat, usually without a back
(Definition of form from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"form" in Business English

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formnoun [C]

uk   us   /fɔːm/
(also US blank) a ​documentprinted with ​spaces in which to write answers or ​information: fill in/out a form You will need to ​fill in form FW 20, ​available from your Social Security ​office. You will be ​required to sign several forms.

formverb

uk   us   /fɔːm/
[I or T] to ​create a ​company, ​organization, etc.: form a business/company/firm They ​joined together to form their own garment ​company.form a committee/agency/task force The ​councilPresident formed the ​committee when the ​number of ​complaintsjumped from around 50 ​per month to nearly 1,200.
[T] to ​develop a ​successfulrelationship with a ​person, ​organization, or country, especially for a particular ​purpose: form a coalition/partnership/alliance A ​regional Latino ​businesscoalition was formed to ​seek ways to fight the ​measures.
(Definition of form from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“form” in Business English

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