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Definition of “fresh” - English Dictionary

"fresh" in American English

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freshadjective

 us   /freʃ/
  • fresh adjective (RECENTLY GROWN/COOKED)

[-er/-est only] (of ​food or ​flowers) ​recentlypicked, made, or ​cooked: fresh ​fruit/​vegetables fresh-baked ​bread Elise is in the ​gardencutting some fresh ​flowers for the ​table. There’s a fresh ​pot of ​coffee on the ​stove. [-er/-est only] Fresh ​food is also ​food in a ​naturalconditionrather than ​artificiallypreserved by a ​process such as ​freezing.
  • fresh adjective (RECENT)

[-er/-est only] recently made or done, and not ​yetchanged by ​time: The ​events of last ​year are still fresh in people’s ​minds.
  • fresh adjective (DIFFERENT)

different or ​additional; ​replacing what ​exists: He’s got a fresh way of ​looking at ​oldmaterial.
  • fresh adjective (COOL)

[-er/-est only] (of ​air) ​clean and ​cool, in a way ​thoughttypical of ​air away from ​cities and ​outsidebuildings: How can we ​keep the ​kidsindoors when they ​want to ​play in the fresh ​air?
  • fresh adjective (CLEAN)

[-er/-est only] clean and ​pleasant: fresh ​bed linens the fresh ​smell of ​pinetrees
  • fresh adjective (NOT SALTY)

[not gradable] (of ​water) from ​rivers and ​lakes and ​therefore not ​salty: Rainfall is the ​solesource of the island’s fresh ​water.
  • fresh adjective (NOT TIRED)

[-er/-est only] energetic and ​enthusiastic; not ​tired: I ​awokefeeling fresh and ​ready to go.
  • fresh adjective (TOO CONFIDENT)

[-er/-est only] being too confident and ​showing a ​lack of ​respect: Don’t get fresh with me, ​young woman!
(Definition of fresh from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"fresh" in British English

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freshadjective

uk   us   /freʃ/
  • fresh adjective (NEW)

B1 [before noun] new or different: The ​originalorders were ​cancelled and I was given fresh ​instructions. Fresh ​evidence has ​emerged that ​castsdoubts on the men's ​conviction. We need to take a fresh ​look at the ​problem. Your ​coffee is ​cold - ​let me make you a fresh ​cup. There has been fresh ​fighting between ​police and ​demonstrators. They ​decided to ​moveabroad and make a fresh start. [before noun] approving new and ​thereforeinteresting or ​exciting: His ​bookoffers some fresh ​insights into the ​eventsleading up to the ​war. We have ​tried to come up with a fresh new ​approach.

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  • fresh adjective (RECENT)

B2 recently made, done, ​arrived, etc., and ​especially not ​yetchanged by ​time: There was a fresh ​fall of ​snow during the ​night. There's nothing ​better than fresh ​bread, ​straight from the ​oven. The ​house, with ​its fresh ​coat of ​paint, ​lookedbeautiful in the ​sunshine. She's fresh out ofcollege and very ​bright. The ​events of last ​year are still fresh in people's ​minds (= ​people can ​remember them ​easily).be fresh out mainly US If you are fresh out of something, you have just ​finished or ​sold all of it, so that there is no more ​left.

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  • fresh adjective (NATURAL)

A2 (of ​food or ​flowers) in a ​naturalconditionrather than ​artificiallypreserved by a ​process such as ​freezing: fresh ​fruit and ​vegetables fresh ​fish/​meat fresh ​coffee

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  • fresh adjective (AIR)

B1 (of ​air) ​clean and ​cool; ​foundoutsiderather than in a ​room: I ​opened the ​window to ​let some fresh ​air in. fresh ​mountainair I'm just going out for a ​breath of fresh ​air. Fresh ​weather is ​cool, sometimes with ​wind: It was a ​lovely, fresh ​springmorning. There's a fresh ​breeze today.
  • fresh adjective (CLEAN)

B1 clean and ​pleasant: I ​feltwonderfullyclean and fresh after my ​shower. I use a ​mouthwash to ​keep my ​breath fresh. This ​wine has a ​light, fresh ​taste.
  • fresh adjective (SKIN)

C2 (of a ​face) ​natural, ​healthy, and ​younglooking: She has a ​lovely fresh (= ​clear and ​smooth) complexion.
  • fresh adjective (TOO CONFIDENT)

informal being too ​confident and ​showing no ​respect, or ​showing by ​youractions or words that you ​want to have ​sex with someone: Don't you get fresh with me, ​young woman! He ​started getting fresh (= ​behaving in a ​sexual way) in the ​cinema, so she ​slapped his ​face.
freshness
noun [U] uk   us   /ˈfreʃ.nəs/

fresh-prefix

uk   us   /freʃ-/
(Definition of fresh from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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