gap Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “gap” - English Dictionary

Definition of "gap" - American English Dictionary

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gapnoun [C]

 us   /ɡæp/
an ​emptyspace or ​opening in the ​middle of something or between two things: Picking up ​speed, she ​closed the gap between them. She has a gap between her ​frontteeth. A gap can be a ​period in which something does not ​happen: After a gap of five ​years, Juanita ​decided to go back to ​workfull-time. A gap can also be something ​lacking: Some ​peopleread to ​fill in gaps in ​theireducation. A gap can also be a ​difference between ​people: He was ​trying to ​bridge the gap between ​elders and ​youth, the ​middleclass and ​poor.
(Definition of gap from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "gap" - British English Dictionary

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gapnoun

uk   us   /ɡæp/

gap noun (HOLE)

B1 [C] an ​emptyspace or ​opening in the ​middle of something or between two things: The ​childrensqueezed through a gap in the ​wall. She has a ​small gap between her ​frontteeth.gap in the market C2 [C] an ​opportunity for a ​product or ​service that does not already ​exist: There is a gap in the ​magazinemarket that ​needs to be ​filled.
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gap noun (DIFFERENCE)

B2 [S] a ​difference between two things: The gap betweenrich and ​poor is still ​widening (= ​becominggreater).B2 [C usually singular] a ​period of ​timespent doing something different: After a gap of five ​years, Jennifer ​decided to go back to ​workfull-time.
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(Definition of gap from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "gap" - Business English Dictionary

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gapnoun [C, usually singular]

uk   us   /ɡæp/
a difference between two ​numbers, ​amounts, or ​levels: Forecasters are ​predicting a budget gap of nearly $17 bn next ​year. There is a $40 million ​shortfall in ​emergencyaid, and the EU is ​increasing its ​donation to close the gap.
something that is missing from a ​situation: close/fill gaps in sth The Bill ​aims to ​close gaps in existing ​law on ​fraud.growing/widening gap New ​federalprojections for ​jobopenings this decade show a ​growing gap in the ​training and ​educationrequired for ​workers.
a ​period in which something does not ​happen: Most see a gap between ​finishingeducation and ​startingwork as a ​positive thing.
a difference between ​people or their ​situations: gap between sth and sth The gap between ​rich and ​poor is ​growing all the ​time.close/fill/widen the gap Excessive ​bonuses have only ​served to widen the gap between ​executives and other ​staff. We have nearly ​closed the math and ​science gender gap in ​education for girls.
a gap in the market an ​opportunity to ​sell a ​product or ​service because a need or ​demand for it exists but no one is ​supplying it: Spotting a gap in the ​market, she decided to set up a clothes ​storageservice.
bridge a/the gap to make the difference between two things ​smaller: Financing was ​slow to come in and the city took out a ​bond to ​bridge the gap.bridge the gap between sth and sth The ​program helps ​working families ​bridge the gap between ​income and ​rent.
(Definition of gap from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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