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Definition of “gauge” - English Dictionary

"gauge" in American English

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gaugeverb [T]

 us   /ɡeɪdʒ/
to ​calculate an ​amount by using a ​measuringdevice or by ​your own ​judgment, or to make a ​judgment about people’s ​feelings: It was not ​easy to gauge his ​height from this ​distance, but he ​seemedprettytall. [+ question word] It’s ​difficult to gauge how they’ll ​react when they ​hear the ​news.

gaugenoun [C]

 us   /ɡeɪdʒ/
a ​device for ​measuring the ​amount or ​size of something: She used a ​pressure gauge to ​measure the ​airpressure in her ​bicycletires. The ​test is ​simply a gauge of (= a way of ​judging) how well they will do in ​college.
A gauge is also a ​measure of the ​thickness of a ​wire or of the ​opening inside the ​barrel (= ​longpart) of a ​gun: a 12-gauge ​shotgun
(Definition of gauge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"gauge" in British English

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gaugeverb [T]

(US also gage) uk   /ɡeɪdʒ/  us   /ɡeɪdʒ/
  • gauge verb [T] (MEASURE)

to ​calculate an ​amount, ​especially by using a ​measuringdevice: Use a ​thermometer to gauge the ​temperature. I ​tried to gauge (= ​guess) the ​weight of the ​box.

gaugenoun

(US also gage) uk   /ɡeɪdʒ/  us   /ɡeɪdʒ/
  • gauge noun (MEASURE)

[C] a ​device for ​measuring the ​amount or ​size of something: a ​fuel/​rain/​temperature gauge
[C] a ​device used to ​measure the ​pressure of the ​air in a ​tyre: a tyre gauge
[C] specialized engineering the ​distance between the rails (= the two ​longmetalbarsattached to the ​ground) on a ​railwayline: a narrow-gauge/standard-gauge ​railway
[C] specialized engineering the ​thickness of something, ​especiallymetal or ​wire
[C] specialized US (UK bore) engineering the ​space inside a ​pipe or ​tube, or the ​diameter of (= ​measurementacross) this ​space: a ​narrow gauge a gauge of 16 ​millimetres
  • gauge noun (JUDGING)

[S] a way of ​judging or ​showing something, ​especially how ​successful or ​popular something is: The ​fact that the ​play is being ​performed on Broadway is a gauge ofitssuccess.

-gaugesuffix

/ -ɡeɪdʒ/  us / -ɡeɪdʒ/ mainly US (UK usually -bore)
(Definition of gauge from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"gauge" in Business English

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gaugeverb [T]

uk   us   /ɡeɪdʒ/
to make a ​judgment about something: What's the best way to gauge ​reallevels of ​taxevasion?gauge what/who/how sth It's not difficult to gauge how the ​markets will ​react to the latest ​fall in ​interestrates.
to ​calculate an ​amount, especially by using a ​measuringdevice

gaugenoun [C]

uk   us   /ɡeɪdʒ/
a way of ​measuring or ​understanding something, for ​example, people's ​opinions or a ​level of something: a gauge of sth Productivity is an important gauge of ​economicperformance. It's not ​easy to get any ​kind of accurate gauge of what young ​peoplethink about this.
a ​method, set of ​calculations, etc. used to ​try to ​predict what will ​happen in the future: According to the government's ​economicforecasting gauge, ​inflation will ​fall by another 1% next ​year.
a ​piece of ​equipment for ​measuring the ​amount or ​size of something: a ​fuel gauge
(Definition of gauge from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“gauge” in Business English

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