gear Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “gear” - English Dictionary

Definition of "gear" - American English Dictionary

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gearnoun

 us   /ɡɪr/

gear noun (MACHINE PART)

(in a ​machine) a ​wheel having ​pointedparts around the ​edge that come together with ​similarparts of other ​wheels to ​control how much ​power from an ​engine goes to the ​movingparts of a ​machine In a ​vehicle, a gear is any of several ​limitedranges of ​power that are used for different ​speeds: [U] Use second gear going up a ​steephill.

gear noun (EQUIPMENT)

[U] equipment or ​clothes used for a ​particularactivity: camping gear

gearverb [always + adv/prep]

 us   /ɡɪr/

gear verb [always + adv/prep] (MAKE READY)

to make something ​ready or ​suitable for a ​particularpurpose: [T] Our ​program is geared to the ​needs of ​children.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of gear from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "gear" - British English Dictionary

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gearnoun

uk   /ɡɪər/  us   /ɡɪr/

gear noun (ENGINE PART)

B2 [C or U] a ​device, often consisting of ​connecting sets of ​wheels with ​teeth (= ​points) around the ​edge, that ​controls how much ​power from an ​engine goes to the ​movingparts of a ​machine: Does ​yourcar have five or six gears? I couldn't ​findreverse gear. The ​car should be in gear (= with ​its gears in ​position, ​allowing the ​vehicle to ​move). When you ​start a ​car you need to be in first (US also low) gear.figurative After a ​slowstart, the ​leadershipcampaignsuddenlyshifted into top gear (= ​started to ​advance very ​quickly).
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gear noun (CLOTHES/EQUIPMENT)

B2 [U] UK the ​equipment, ​clothes, etc. that you use to do a ​particularactivity: fishing/​camping gear Police in riot gear (= ​protectiveclothing)arrived to ​control the ​protesters.
See also
B2 informal clothes: She ​wears all the ​latest gear.
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gear noun (DRUGS)

[U] UK slang drugs: The ​traffickersknew that there would always be someone ​willing to ​move the gear.
(Definition of gear from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "gear" - Business English Dictionary

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gearnoun [U]

uk   us   /ɡɪər/
a ​system or ​piece of ​equipment: A good ​place to ​connect with other ​consumers is Epinions.com, which ​postsreviews on all ​sorts of ​gadgets and gear. computer/​electronic/​networking gear
equipment or clothes that are used for a particular ​activity: The ​workers said they received no ​protective gear or ​warnings about the dangers of asbestos.
informal the ​speed at which something ​happens or is done: After a ​slowstart, the ​leadershipcampaign suddenly shifted into gear. high/​low/​top gear
move/step up a gear UK informal to ​start to do something better or faster: The ​pricewar stepped up a gear yesterday when two ​majorchains announced they were ​cutting the ​cost of ​petrol.
(Definition of gear from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“gear” in Business English

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