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Definition of “graft” - English Dictionary

"graft" in American English

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graftnoun

 us   /ɡræft/
  • graft noun (INFLUENCE)

[U] (esp. in politics) the obtaining of money or advantage through the dishonest use of power and influence: His administration was marked by widespread graft and crime.
  • graft noun (TISSUE)

[C] biology a piece of healthy skin or bone cut usually from a person’s own body and used to repair a damaged part on that person
[C] biology A graft is also a piece cut from a living plant and fixed to another plant so that it grows there.
graft
verb [T]  us   /ɡræft/
(Definition of graft from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"graft" in British English

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graftnoun

uk   /ɡrɑːft/  us   /ɡræft/

graftverb

uk   /ɡrɑːft/  us   /ɡræft/
(Definition of graft from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"graft" in Business English

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graftnoun [U]

uk   us   /ɡrɑːft/ LAW
US illegal activities involving dishonest use of power and money: Corruption in government is common, and several elected officials are suspected of graft. graft charge/allegation/investigation
UK informal hard work: The students, all from poor families, tell stories of hard graft and achievement.

graftverb [I]

uk   us   /ɡrɑːft/
UK informal to work hard: We'll have to graft like mad to be ranked in the top ten this year.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of graft from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“graft” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
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by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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