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Definition of “green” - English Dictionary

"green" in American English

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greenadjective, noun [C/U]

 us   /ɡrin/
  • green adjective, noun [C/U] (COLOR)

(of) the color that is a mixture of blue and yellow; the color of grass: a green dress [C] I don’t like that green.

greenadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /ɡrin/
of or relating to grass, trees, and other plants: I’d like a green salad (= made with leafy vegetables).
relating to the protection of the environment: green politics
not experienced or trained: I was pretty green when I joined this company.

greennoun [C]

 us   /ɡrin/ regional US
  • green noun [C] (PLANTS)

an area planted with grass, esp. for use by the public: The fair will be held on the green behind the library.
A green is also an area of smooth grass surrounding a hole on a golf course.
(Definition of green from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"green" in British English

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greenadjective

uk   /ɡriːn/  us   /ɡriːn/
  • green adjective (COLOUR)

A1 of a colour between blue and yellow; of the colour of grass: green vegetables

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  • green adjective (POLITICAL)

B2 relating to the protection of the environment: green politics/issues a green campaigner/activist the Green Party
go green
to do more to protect nature and the environment: The Chancellor proposed a crackdown on car and plane emissions, and the introduction of tax incentives to go green.

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greenness
noun [U] uk   /ˈɡriːn.nəs/  us   /ˈɡriːn.nəs/
the quality of being green: What first struck her when she arrived in England was the greenness of the landscape.

greennoun

uk   /ɡriːn/  us   /ɡriːn/
  • green noun (COLOUR)

A2 [C or U] the colour of grass; a colour between blue and yellow: light/pale green dark/bottle green

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  • green noun (GRASS)

[C] an area planted with grass, especially for use by the public: Children were playing on the village green.
[C] mainly UK used as a part of a name: Sheep's Green

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Greennoun [C]

uk   /ɡriːn/  us   /ɡriːn/
(Definition of green from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"green" in Business English

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greenadjective

uk   us   /ɡriːn/ ENVIRONMENT, SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
relating to or believing in the protection of the natural environment: green issues/politics/solutions Small companies need green solutions to be more affordable. Car manufacturers are investing in green technology. Their recycling policies are very green. a green campaigner/activist Companies are becoming greener in response to customer expectations.
go green
to start doing things in a way that protects the natural environment: There are many benefits for developers and builders who decide to go green. My supermarket went green last year and has stopped supplying free plastic bags.
(Definition of green from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“green” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

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