group Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “group” - English Dictionary

Definition of "group" - American English Dictionary

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groupnoun [C]

 us   /ɡrup/
a ​number of ​people or things that are together or ​considered as a ​unit: a group of ​trees I’m ​meeting a group of ​friends for ​dinner. A group is also a ​number of ​people who ​playmusic together, ​especiallypopularmusic: a ​rock/​soul group chemistry A group is also any of the ​columns in the periodic table of ​chemicalelements.
group
verb [T]  us   /ɡrup/
She grouped the ​children by ​height for the ​classphotograph.
(Definition of group from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "group" - British English Dictionary

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groupnoun

uk   us   /ɡruːp/

group noun (SET)

A1 [C] a ​number of ​people or things that are put together or ​considered as a ​unit: I'm ​meeting a group offriends for ​dinnertonight. The ​car was ​parked near a ​small group oftrees. She ​showed me another group ofpictures, this ​time of ​childrenplaying.
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group noun (MUSIC)

A1 [C, + sing/pl verb] a ​number of ​people who ​playmusic together, ​especiallypopmusic: What's ​yourfavourite group? a ​pop/​rock group
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group noun (BUSINESS)

[C] a ​business that ​contains several different ​companies: United News Media, the ​nationalnewspaper and ​television group

group noun (SPORT)

[C] a ​number of ​footballteams who ​play each other in a ​competition. The ​winners of the group ​move onto the next ​stage of the competion : The Danes were the ​surprisewinners of ​their group.the group stages the first ​part of a ​footballcompetition in which ​teams are ​divided into groups and ​play only the other ​teams in ​their group. The ​winners of each group ​move onto the next ​stage of the ​competition: The ​teamfailed to ​progress beyond the group ​stages of Euro 20012.

groupverb [I or T, + adv/prep]

uk   us   /ɡruːp/
C1 to ​form a group or put ​people or things into a group: We all grouped together around the ​bride for a ​familyphotograph. I grouped the ​childrenaccording to ​age. The ​books were grouped by ​size.
(Definition of group from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "group" - Business English Dictionary

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groupnoun

uk   us   /ɡruːp/
[C] (also group of companies) a ​business that contains several different ​companies: Under the group's ​finalsalarypensionscheme, his ​pension is ​increased for every ​year he ​served. a television/​banking/​construction group group ​accounts/​sales
a ​number of ​people or things that are put together or considered as a ​single thing: group of sth This ​deal has been ​backed by a group of ​externalinvestors. This group of ​drugs are known as taxanes. I want someone who is going to ​work in a group. a group discussion/​interview/​assignment
(Definition of group from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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