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Definition of “heart” - English Dictionary

"heart" in American English

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heartnoun

 us   /hɑrt/
  • heart noun (ORGAN)

[C] the ​organ inside the ​chest that ​sends the ​blood around the ​body: heart ​disease The ​paramedics took his ​pulse to ​see if his heart was still ​beating.
  • heart noun (EMOTIONS)

[C/U] the ​center of a person’s ​emotions, or the ​generalcharacter of someone: [C] He has a good/​kind heart (= is a ​kind and ​generousperson). [C] Our hearts were ​broken (= We were very ​sad) at the ​news of the ​accident. [C] Homelessness is a ​subjectclose/near to her heart (= is ​important to her and is a ​subject she ​feelsstrongly about). [U] In his heart (= According to his ​truefeelings), he ​knew she was ​right. She can be ​abrupt with ​people at ​times, but at heart (= ​basically) she’s a good ​person.
  • heart noun (CENTER)

[C/U] the ​central or most ​importantpart: [C usually sing] Protestors ​marched through the heart of the ​city.
[C/U] The heart of a ​vegetable, esp. a ​leafy one, is ​itsfirm, ​centralpart: [C] artichoke hearts
  • heart noun (SHAPE)

[C] a ​shape used to ​represent the heart, esp. as a ​symbol of ​love
(Definition of heart from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"heart" in British English

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heartnoun

uk   /hɑːt/  us   /hɑːrt/
  • heart noun (ORGAN)

A2 [C] the ​organ in ​yourchest that ​sends the ​blood around ​yourbody: He's got a ​weak/​bad heart (= his heart is not ​healthy). Isabel's heart was ​beatingfast with ​fright.

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  • heart noun (EMOTIONS)

B1 [C or U] used to refer to a person's ​character, or the ​place within a ​person where ​feelings or ​emotions are ​considered to come from: She has a good heart (= she is a ​kindperson). I ​love you, and I ​mean it from the ​bottom of my heart (= very ​sincerely). I ​love you with all my heart (= very much). He said he'd never ​marry but he had a change of heart (= his ​feelingschanged) when he ​met her. Homelessness is a ​subject very close/​dear to her heart (= is very ​important to her and she has ​strongfeelings about it). He broke her heart (= made her very ​sad) when he ​left her for another woman. It breaks my heart (= makes me ​feel very ​sad) to ​see him so ​unhappy. They say he ​died of a broken heart (= because he was so ​sad).old-fashioned It does my heart good (= makes me very ​happy) to ​see those ​children so ​happy. His heart leaped (= he ​suddenlyfelt very ​excited and ​happy) when the ​phonerang.

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  • heart noun (CENTRAL PART)

B1 [S] the ​central or most ​importantpart: The ​demonstrators will ​march through the heart of the ​capital. A ​disagreement about ​boundaries is at the heart of the ​dispute. Let's get to the heart of the ​matter.
[C] the ​firmcentralpart of a ​vegetable, ​especially one with a lot of ​leaves: artichoke hearts the heart of a ​lettuce

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  • heart noun (COURAGE)

C2 [U] courage, ​determination, or ​hope: You're doing really well - don't lose heart now. Take heart - things can only get ​better.
  • heart noun (CARDS)

hearts
[plural or U] one of the four suits in ​playingcards, ​represented by a ​red heart ​shape: the seven/​ace of hearts
[C] a ​playingcard from the suit of hearts: In this ​game, a heart ​beats a ​club.

heartverb [T]

uk   /hɑːt/  us   /hɑːrt/
(Definition of heart from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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