hedge Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “hedge” - English Dictionary

Definition of "hedge" - American English Dictionary

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hedgenoun [C]

 us   /hedʒ/

hedge noun [C] (BUSHES)

a ​line of ​bushes or ​smalltreesplantedclose together, esp. along the ​edge of a ​yard or ​road

hedge noun [C] (PROTECTION)

a ​means of ​protection, ​control, or ​limitation: She ​invested in ​foreigncompanies as a hedge against ​inflation.

hedgeverb [I/T]

 us   /hedʒ/

hedge verb [I/T] (LIMIT)

to ​limit something ​severely: [T] Congressmen were ​warned against hedging ​theirsupport for the ​missileprogram. To hedge is also to ​try to ​avoid giving an ​answer or taking any ​action: [I] Officials ​continued to hedge on ​exactly when the ​program would ​begin.
(Definition of hedge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "hedge" - British English Dictionary

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hedgenoun [C]

uk   us   /hedʒ/

hedge noun [C] (BUSHES)

B2 a ​line of ​bushes or ​smalltreesplanted very ​close together, ​especially along the ​edge of a ​garden, ​field, or ​road: a ​privet hedge
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hedge noun [C] (PROTECTION)

a way of ​protecting, ​controlling, or ​limiting something: She'd made some ​overseasinvestments as a hedge againstrisinginflation in this ​country.

hedge noun [C] (GRAMMAR)

specialized language a word or phrase that makes what you say less ​strong

hedgeverb

uk   us   /hedʒ/
[T + adv/prep, usually passive] to ​limit something ​severely: We've got ​permission, but it's hedged about/around withstrictconditions. [I] to ​try to ​avoid giving an ​answer or taking any ​action: Stop hedging and ​tell me what you really ​think.
(Definition of hedge from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "hedge" - Business English Dictionary

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hedgenoun [C]

uk   us   /hedʒ/ FINANCE, STOCK MARKET
an ​investment made in ​order to ​reduce the ​risk of ​losingmoney on ​shares, ​bonds, etc. that you own, for ​example, by ​buying futures (= ​agreements to ​sellshares for a particular ​price at a ​date in the future) or options (= the ​rights to ​buy or ​sellshares for a particular ​price within a particular ​timeperiod): These ​formulas are ​devised to tell the ​bank what ​kind of hedges to ​purchase to ​provide the best possible ​protection of its ​assets.a hedge against sth In recent ​years, ​investors have also ​boughtgold as a hedge against US ​dollarweakness. inflation hedges

hedgeverb [I or T]

uk   us   /hedʒ/
FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to ​reduce the ​risk of ​losingmoney on ​shares, ​bonds, etc. that you own, for ​example by ​buying futures (= ​agreements to ​sellshares for a particular ​price at a ​date in the future) or options (= the ​rights to ​buy or ​sellshares for a particular ​price within a particular ​timeperiod): Europeanairports have been ​attractinginvestorskeen to hedge ​long-termpension liabilities. We don't tend to hedge at all - in either ​stock or ​bondfunds.hedge against sth Companies can hedge against ​currencymovements, but many choose not to.hedge risk/exposure Airbus has hedged enough of its ​dollarexposure that a ​majorshort-termimpact is unlikely.
hedge your bets to ​reduce the ​risk of ​failure or of ​losingmoney by making sure that you can choose between different possibilities: Some ​businessleaders hedged their ​bets by ​donatingmoney to both ​parties. Futures ​contractsallowcompanies in the ​nuclearsector to hedge their ​bets against ​pricerises this ​year, next ​year or 10 ​years from now.
(Definition of hedge from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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