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Definition of “hello” - English Dictionary

"hello" in American English

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helloexclamation, noun [C]

 us   /heˈloʊ, hə-/ (plural hellos)
used when meeting or greeting someone: "Hello, Paul," she said, "I haven’t seen you for months." I know her vaguely – we’ve exchanged hellos a few times. Come and say hello to my friends (= meet them).
Hello is also said at the beginning of a telephone conversation.
Hello is also used to attract someone’s attention: She walked into the shop and called out, "Hello! Is anybody here?"
(Definition of hello from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"hello" in British English

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helloexclamation, noun

uk   /helˈəʊ/  us   /helˈoʊ/ (also mainly UK hallo, hullo)
A1 used when meeting or greeting someone: Hello, Paul. I haven't seen you for ages. I know her vaguely - we've exchanged hellos a few times. I just thought I'd call by and say hello. And a big hello (= welcome) to all the parents who've come to see the show.
A1 something that is said at the beginning of a phone conversation: "Hello, I'd like some information about flights to the US, please."
something that is said to attract someone's attention: The front door was open so she walked inside and called out, "Hello! Is there anybody in?"
informal said to someone who has just said or done something stupid, especially something that shows they are not noticing what is happening: She asked me if I'd just arrived and I was like "Hello, I've been here for an hour."
old-fashioned an expression of surprise: Hello, this is very strange - I know that man.

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(Definition of hello from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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