high Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “high” - English Dictionary

Definition of "high" - American English Dictionary

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highadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /hɑɪ/

high adjective [-er/-est only] (DISTANCE)

(esp. of things that are not ​living) being a ​largedistance from ​top to ​bottom or a ​long way above the ​ground, or having the ​stateddistance from ​top to ​bottom: Mount Everest is the highest ​mountain in the ​world. We had to ​climb over a ​wall that was ten ​feet high.

high adjective [-er/-est only] (ABOVE AVERAGE)

greater than the ​usuallevel: high ​standards of ​quality high ​salaries a high ​level of ​concentration She was ​driving at high ​speed on a ​wetroad. The ​companiesproduce high-quality ​oliveoils. Something's high ​point is the ​time when it is the most ​successful, ​enjoyable, ​important, or ​valuable: The high ​point of my ​week is ​arrivinghome from ​work on a ​Fridayevening.

high adjective [-er/-est only] (IMPORTANT)

having ​power, ​greatinfluence, or an ​importantposition: He is an ​officer of high ​rank. She has a lot of ​friends in high ​places (= in ​positions of ​power).

high adjective [-er/-est only] (SOUND)

near or at the ​top of the ​range of ​sounds: Dog ​whistlesplaynotes that are too high for ​humanbeings to ​hear.

high adjective [-er/-est only] (FEELING HAPPY)

feelingextremelyhappy, ​excited, or ​full of ​energy: He was so high after ​winning the ​race that he couldn’t ​sit still.in high spirits Someone who is in high ​spirits is ​extremelyhappy and ​enjoying the ​situation: She was in high ​spirits after ​scoring the ​winningbasket.

highadverb [-er/-est only]

 us   /hɑɪ/

high adverb [-er/-est only] (AT LARGE DISTANCE)

at or to a ​largedistance from the ​ground: The Concorde ​flies much higher than most ​airplanes.

highnoun

 us   /hɑɪ/

high noun (HIGH LEVEL)

[C] a higher ​level than has ​ever been ​reached before: Interest ​rates have ​reached an all-time high.

high noun (HAPPY PERIOD)

[C usually sing] a ​period of ​extremeexcitement or ​happiness, when you ​feelfull of ​energy: There are ​lots of highs and ​lows in this ​job.
(Definition of high from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "high" - British English Dictionary

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highadjective

uk   us   /haɪ/

high adjective (DISTANCE)

A2 (​especially of things that are not ​living) being a ​largedistance from ​top to ​bottom or a ​long way above the ​ground, or having the ​stateddistance from ​top to ​bottom: a high ​building/​mountain high ​ceilings It's two and a ​halfmetres high and one ​metrewide. The ​corngrew waist-high (= as high as a person's ​waist) in the ​fields.
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high adjective (ABOVE AVERAGE)

B1 greater than the ​usuallevel or ​amount: The ​jobdemands a high level ofconcentration. He ​suffers from high ​bloodpressure. Antique ​furniturefetches very high ​prices these ​days. She got very high ​marks in her ​geographyexam. It's very ​dangerous to ​drive at high ​speed when the ​roads are ​wet. He's in a high-security ​prison.high in sth C1 containing a ​largequantity of something: I ​avoidfoods that are high in ​fat.high standards/principles B1 very good or very ​moralstandards: She was a woman of high ​principles. She ​demands very high ​standards from the ​people who ​work for her.high winds fast, ​strongwind: High ​windscauseddelays on the ​ferries.
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high adjective (IMPORTANT)

B2 having ​power, an ​importantposition, or ​greatinfluence: an ​officer of high ​rank
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high adjective (SOUND)

near or at the ​top of the ​range of ​sounds: I can't ​reach the high ​notes.

high adjective (BAD)

UK (of ​food) ​smellingbad and no ​longer good to ​eat: This ​meat is ​rather high - I'm going to ​throw it out.

high adjective (MENTAL STATE)

C2 not ​thinking or ​behavingnormally because of taking ​drugs: He was high onheroin at the ​time.

highnoun

uk   us   /haɪ/

high noun (ABOVE AVERAGE)

[C] a higher ​level than has ​ever been ​reachedpreviously: Interest ​rates have ​reached an all-time/​record high.
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high noun (MENTAL STATE)

[C usually singular] a ​period of ​extremeexcitement or ​happiness when you ​feelfull of ​energy, often ​caused by a ​feeling of ​success, or by ​drugs or ​alcohol or a ​religiousexperience: Exercise gives you a high. She's been on a high ​ever since she got her ​articlepublished in the Times. There are ​lots of highs and ​lows in this ​job.

high noun (EDUCATION)

[S] US informal for high school (when used in the ​name of a ​school): I go to ​Santa Ana High.

highadverb

uk   us   /haɪ/
B1 at or to a ​largedistance from the ​ground: You'll have to ​hit the ​ballquite high to get it over that ​net. The new ​jetflew much higher than most ​planes.
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(Definition of high from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "high" - Business English Dictionary

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highadjective

uk   us   /haɪ/
greater than the usual ​level or ​amount: high ​interestrates/​costs/​expenses/​pricesa high degree/percentage/proportion The ​researchevidence all ​indicates a high degree of ​customersatisfaction with the ​product.
[usually before noun] in a ​position of ​power, ​importance, or great ​influence: The ​firm has been propelled from ​investment banking's third ​division to its highest ​rank.
better than the usual ​quality or ​standard: She ​demanded and ​achieved high ​standards from those with whom she ​worked. The ​companystressesspeed, ​lowcost, and high ​quality in its ​products. The ​community has a ​stableworkforce, good ​jobs and a high ​quality of ​life.

highnoun [C]

uk   us   /haɪ/
a higher ​level than has been ​reached previously: Stocks end at new highs for the fourth ​session in a row.
highs and lows [plural] the ​times that ​follow each other when a ​company, ​career, ​investment, etc. is ​successful and when it is not: All ​jobs have an element of ​routine and a ​cycle of highs and ​lows. Jonathan, 25, has already seen some of the highs and ​lows of the ​businessworld.
from on high informal WORKPLACE from ​seniorpeople in an ​organization: If the ​changes are to be ​sustainable, they should not merely be ​imposed upon ​employees from on high.

highadverb

uk   us   /haɪ/
at or to a ​position of greater ​importance or ​influence: As she ​rose higher in the ​firm she began to clash with other ​topexecutives.
at or to more than the usual ​level or ​amount: Interest ​ratesmoved higher, in ​response to ​signs of an ​economicrebound.
(Definition of high from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“high” in Business English

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