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Definition of “hit” - English Dictionary

"hit" in American English

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hitverb [T]

 us   /hɪt/
  • hit verb [T] (TOUCH FORCEFULLY)

(present participle hitting, past tense and past participle hit) to ​touchquickly and ​forcefully, with the ​hand or an ​object: Don’t hit ​your little ​brother! They were ​throwingrocks, and one of the ​rocks hit a ​window and ​broke it. She must have ​fallenasleep, and the ​car hit a ​tree.
(present participle hitting, past tense and past participle hit) If something hits ​part of ​yourbody, or you hit it, you come up against it by ​accident: He’s so ​tall he ​keeps hitting his ​head when he goes through a ​doorway.
(present participle hitting, past tense and past participle hit) Someone who is hit by a ​bullet or ​explosiveweapon is ​injured by it: One ​journalist was hit in the ​leg by a ​straybullet.
  • hit verb [T] (HAVE EFFECT)

(present participle hitting, past tense and past participle hit) to have an ​unpleasant or ​negativeeffect on a ​person or thing: Commuters are going to be hit hard by the ​rise in ​gasolineprices.
(present participle hitting, past tense and past participle hit) infml If an ​importantfact hits you, you ​suddenlyunderstand the ​meaning of it: It just hit me that ​once she ​leaves, I may never ​see her again.
  • hit verb [T] (ARRIVE AT)

(present participle hitting, past tense and past participle hit) infml to ​arrive at a ​place, ​position, or ​state: The company’s ​profits hit an all-time high last ​year.
  • hit verb [T] (BASEBALL)

to make a ​thrownbaseball move within the ​playingarea by ​touching it with a ​bat (= ​stick): Rodriguez hit a high ​flyball that was ​caught by the shortstop.

hitnoun [C]

 us   /hɪt/
  • hit noun [C] (SUCCESS)

someone or something that is very ​popular or ​successful: The ​musical is one of the ​biggest hits on Broadway.
  • hit noun [C] (BASEBALL)

a ​base hit: Jason had three hits in four ​times at ​bat.
  • hit noun [C] (FORCEFUL TOUCH)

the ​act of hitting someone or something, or an ​occasion when someone or something is hit: The ​hospital took a ​direct hit from a ​bomb.
(Definition of hit from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"hit" in British English

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hitverb

uk   /hɪt/  us   /hɪt/ (present participle hitting, past tense and past participle hit)
  • hit verb (TOUCH)

A2 [T] to ​moveyourhand or an ​object onto the ​surface of something so that it ​touches it, usually with ​force: Teachers are not ​allowed to hit ​theirpupils. This ​type of ​glass won't ​shatter no ​matter how hard you hit it. She hit her ​thumb with the ​hammer.
B1 [T] to ​touch something with ​suddenforce: They were going about 60 ​kilometres an ​hour when ​theircar hit the ​tree. One ​journalist was hit in the ​leg by a ​straybullet. That new ​shelf in the ​bathroom is too ​low - I just hit my ​head on it.

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  • hit verb (EFFECT)

B2 [T] to have an ​unpleasant or ​negativeeffect on a ​person or thing: Production has been ​badly hit by the ​strike. Demand for ​transatlanticflights has been hit by ​fears of ​terroristattacks.
C2 [T] If an ​idea or ​thought hits you, you ​suddenlythink of it: That's when it hit me that my ​life would never be the same again.

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  • hit verb (SHOOT)

[T often passive] to ​shoot at or ​bomb a ​place or ​person, ​causingdamage or ​injury: Two ​schools were hit during the ​airraid. He was hit in the ​neck by a ​bullet from a ​sniper. Try to hit the ​middle of the ​target.

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  • hit verb (REACH)

C1 [T] to ​arrive at a ​place or ​position: If we ​turnleft at the next ​junction, we should hit the ​mainroad after five ​miles or so.
C1 [T] to ​succeed in ​reaching or ​achieving something: Our ​profits hit an ​all-time high of $20 million last ​year. I just can't hit (= ​sing) those high ​notes like I used to.

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  • hit verb (SUCCESS)

hit it off informal
B2 to like someone and ​becomefriendlyimmediately: I didn't really hit it off with his ​friends. Jake and Sue hit it off ​immediately.

hitnoun [C]

uk   /hɪt/  us   /hɪt/
  • hit noun [C] (SUCCESS)

B1 a thing or ​person that is very ​popular or ​successful: The Beatles had a ​string of number-one hits in the 1960s. Your ​cake was a ​real hit at the ​party - everyone ​commented. They've just ​released an ​album of ​their greatest hits (= ​their most ​successfulsongs).

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  • hit noun [C] (TOUCH)

the ​act of hitting something or someone, or an ​occasion when something or someone hits you: She gave him a hit on the ​head which ​knocked him ​flying.
in ​baseball, when the batter (= ​persontrying to hit the ​ball)safelyreaches first ​base after hitting the ​ball
  • hit noun [C] (SHOOT)

an ​occasion when something that has been ​thrown, ​dropped, ​shot, etc. at a ​place or ​objectreaches that ​place or ​object: The ​rebelheadquarters took a direct hit from a ​bomb during the ​attack. I ​scored a hit on my second ​shot.
  • hit noun [C] (ATTACK)

mainly US slang an ​act of ​murder: He was the ​victim of a ​mafia hit.
(Definition of hit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hit" in Business English

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hitverb

uk   us   /hɪt/ (-tt-, hit)
[I or T] to have an unpleasant or ​negativeeffect on someone or something : Rising ​fuelcosts hit ​industrial and ​ruralareas worst. Companies tend to be ​slow to ​lay off ​employees when hard ​times hit, but they are quicker to cease ​hiring.be hit by sth Oil ​firms have been hit by a 10% ​increase in ​petroleumtax.be hit with sth A tractor made in the United ​States and ​shipped to Chile is hit with $25,000 in ​tariffs and ​duties.
[T] to ​reach a particular ​level or ​amount, especially a very high or very ​low one: Sales hit $300 million within the first three ​years.hit an all-time/a record high/low Last week ​propertyshares hit a ​recordlow. The ​company is very capable of hitting its targets well ​ahead of ​schedule.
[T] informal to ​experience a difficult ​situation or ​stop making ​progress with something: Talks between the ​bosses and the ​union yesterday hit a ​majorsetback. The ​project began smoothly, but then we began to hit some problems.
hit the market/shops/shelves
informal to become ​available for ​people to ​buy: Although the toys are only just now hitting the ​market, a huge ​advertisingcampaign has been in ​place for several months.
be hit hard/be hard hit (by sth)
to be badly affected by something: Car ​makers were among the ​hardest hit as ​consumersbought fewer ​vehicles last month. The ​area has been hit hard by ​joblosses in ​textiles and furniture.
hit a wall
to ​reach a ​point at which no more ​progress can be made: The ​energybill is expected to hit a ​wall in the Senate, where Republicans have enough ​votes to ​block it.
hit bottom
informal to ​reach an extremely ​lowlevel: The U.S. ​economy is beginning to show ​signs that it is hitting ​bottom and that a ​turnaround could get underway later this ​year.
hit it big
informal to become very ​successful: The ​company hit it ​big when they received an ​order for three ​commercialsatellites.
hit the buffers
mainly UK informal to suddenly ​stop being ​successful or ​stophappening: The ​main worry is that the ​economy might hit the ​buffers. Their ​plans to become one of the world's largest ​telecomsfirms has hit the ​buffers.
hit the ground running
informal to immediately ​work hard and successfully at a new ​activity: Companies often expect ​staff to hit the ​groundrunning.
hit the headlines
to receive a lot of ​attention in ​newsreports: He hit the headlines when he ​sold a million ​shares at £5.80 a ​share.
hit the jackpot
to ​achievefinancialsuccess: They need a ​licensingdeal to a ​bigdrugcompany before ​judging if their ​biotechventure has hit the ​jackpot.
hit the wall US
to be a ​financialfailure: The ​questionmark is whether the ​company is going to hit the ​wall.

hitnoun [C]

uk   us   /hɪt/
a thing or ​person that is very popular or ​successful: a hit with sb/sth The Mexican ​restaurant is a huge hit with ​locals, who swear by the Mexican pizzas and fried bread dishes. Plans ​call for ​doubling both the ​workforce and ​production if the ​vehicles prove a hit.
E-COMMERCE, MARKETING a visit to a particular ​website on the ​internet, which is then counted to ​calculate the ​number of ​people who see the ​website: attract/get/receive hits The ​site typically gets an ​average of about 400,000 hits a day.
something that has an unpleasant or ​negativeeffect on a ​person or thing: a hit to sth Investors are worried about the ​direct hit to ​consumerconfidence. For some ​businesses, the financial hit was ​substantial.
take a hit
to be badly affected by a difficult ​situation or problem: Consumer ​spendingaccounts for more than two-thirds of the nation's ​economicactivity, so when ​consumers take a hit, so does the ​economy.
to have to ​pay an unusual ​cost: The ​company recently took a hit to the ​tune of $4 million in ​healthinsurancecosts.
(Definition of hit from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“hit” in Business English

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