Definition of “hitch” - English Dictionary

“hitch” in British English

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hitchnoun [ C ]

uk /hɪtʃ/ us /hɪtʃ/

hitchverb

uk /hɪtʃ/ us /hɪtʃ/

hitch verb (RIDE)

hitch a lift/ride informal

to get a free ride in someone else's vehicle as a way of travelling:

They hitched a lift to Edinburgh from a passing car.

Phrasal verb(s)

(Definition of “hitch” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“hitch” in American English

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hitchnoun [ C ]

us /hɪtʃ/

hitch noun [ C ] (DIFFICULTY)

a difficulty or troubling fact esp. in a situation that is generally positive:

I finally did get a job offer that sounded perfect – the only hitch was the low salary.
The taping at Channel 4 went off without a hitch (= perfectly).

hitchverb [ T ]

us /hɪtʃ/

hitch verb [ T ] (RIDE)

to get a free ride in someone else’s road vehicle as a way of traveling:

Nancy hitched a ride with her husband’s cousin.

hitch verb [ T ] (FASTEN)

to fasten something to another thing, such as a vehicle:

We just need to hitch the trailer to the car and then we can go.

(Definition of “hitch” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“hitch” in Business English

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hitchnoun [ C ]

uk /hɪtʃ/ us

a difficulty, usually one that is unexpected:

a legal/technical hitch The airline has been plagued by technical hitches and staff shortages.
The steady ascent of the company's profits continued without a hitch for an impressive 26 quarters.

hitchverb [ T ]

uk /hɪtʃ/ us
hitch your fortunes/future/wagon to sth/sb

to rely on something or someone to bring you success:

The former oil industry investor has hitched his wagon to renewable energy.

(Definition of “hitch” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)