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Definition of “hock” - English Dictionary

"hock" in American English

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hockverb [T]

 us   /hɑk/ infml
to ​exchange in ​return for ​borrowingmoney; ​pawn: to hock ​jewelry

hocknoun

 us   /hɑk/
in hock
To be in hock is to have a ​debt: The ​state is in hock already, with a $13 ​billiondeficit.
(Definition of hock from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"hock" in British English

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hocknoun

uk   /hɒk/  us   /hɑːk/
  • hock noun (MONEY)

in hock
in ​debt: The company's ​entireassets are now in hock to the ​banks.
Possessions that are in hock are pawned (= ​lefttemporarily with a ​person in ​exchange for an ​amount of ​money that must be ​paid back after a ​limitedtime to ​prevent the thing from being ​sold): Most of her ​jewellery is in hock.
  • hock noun (WINE)

[U] mainly UK a ​type of ​whitewine from Germany

hockverb [T]

uk   /hɒk/  us   /hɑːk/ informal
(Definition of hock from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hock" in Business English

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hocknoun [U]

uk   us   /hɒk/ informal
in hock (to sb/sth)
in ​debt: Most ​constructionfirms are deeply in hock to a ​singlebank rather than to a handful of ​lenders.
possessions that are in hock are pawned (= ​left temporarily with someone in ​exchange for an ​amount of ​money that must be ​paid back after a particular ​period of ​time to prevent the thing from being ​sold): He put everything he had in hock to ​buy the ​house, and still ​ended up ​owingmoney.
go into/get out of hock
to get into or get out of ​debt: Until we either ​curb our appetite for ​imports or become a lot better at ​exporting, the more we ​trade the ​deeper we go into hock Few believe that any ​legalaction can ​yield the ​billions that the ​companyneeds to get out of hock.

hockverb [T]

uk   us   /hɒk/
to pawn a ​possession (= ​leave it temporarily with someone in ​exchange for an ​amount of ​money that must be ​paid back after a particular ​period of ​time to prevent it from being ​sold): People in a ​financial difficulty often ​possess something of ​value to hock.
See also
(Definition of hock from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“hock” in Business English

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