hot Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Definition of “hot” - English Dictionary

"hot" in American English

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hotadjective

 us   /hɑt/
  • hot adjective (VERY WARM)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) having a high temperature: a hot day a hot meal It’s hotter in Ohio than it is here. Matt makes his little sister hot chocolate (= a warm drink made with chocolate).
  • hot adjective (SPICY)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) (of food) causing a feeling in the mouth like burning or tingling (= as if a lot of sharp points are being put in quickly and lightly): If you like curry really hot, you can add some hot peppers and hot sauce.
  • hot adjective (ANGRY)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) easily excited, or angry: She’s hot-tempered. I got really hot about them not recycling.
  • hot adjective (GOOD)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) infml very good and having energy: Right now the stock market is hot. The show isn’t so hot. He doesn’t feel so hot.
  • hot adjective (STOLEN)

[not gradable] slang (of goods) stolen and therefore difficult to sell: Those CD players are so cheap, they must be hot.
  • hot adjective (DANGEROUS)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) infml (of a situation) dangerous or difficult; risky: Things got a lot hotter when the military took over.
  • hot adjective (ATTRACTIVE)

(Definition of hot from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"hot" in British English

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hotadjective

uk   /hɒt/  us   /hɑːt/ (hotter, hottest)
  • hot adjective (VERY WARM)

A1 having a high temperature: a hot, sunny day hot weather a hot drink/meal It's too hot in here, can we turn down the heating? Bake the cake in a hot oven, about 220°C, for 30 minutes. The food was piping hot (= very hot).

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  • hot adjective (SPICY)

B1 used to describe food that causes a burning feeling in the mouth: a hot curry hot, spicy food
Opposite

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  • hot adjective (CAUSING DISAGREEMENT)

C1 used to describe a subject that causes a lot of disagreement or discussion: Global warming has become a very hot issue.
  • hot adjective (NEW/EXCITING)

C1 new and exciting: Hollywood's hottest new actress hot gossip This 21-year-old actor has become Hollywood's hottest property.

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  • hot adjective (MOST LIKELY)

hot tip informal
an accurate piece of advice about who will win a race: Do you have any hot tips for this afternoon's race?
hot favourite UK
the person or animal that is most likely to win a race, competition, election, etc.: He's the hot favourite to win the election.
  • hot adjective (SEXY)

informal sexually attractive, or feeling sexually excited: She's really hot! I'm hot for you, baby. I've got a hot date tonight.
(Definition of hot from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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