hot Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Definition of “hot” - English Dictionary

"hot" in American English

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hotadjective

 us   /hɑt/
  • hot adjective (VERY WARM)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) having a high ​temperature: a hot ​day a hot ​meal It’s hotter in Ohio than it is here. Matt makes his little ​sister hot ​chocolate (= a ​warmdrink made with ​chocolate).
  • hot adjective (SPICY)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) (of ​food) causing a ​feeling in the ​mouth like ​burning or ​tingling (= as if a lot of ​sharppoints are being put in ​quickly and ​lightly): If you like ​curry really hot, you can ​add some hot ​peppers and hot ​sauce.
  • hot adjective (ANGRY)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) easilyexcited, or ​angry: She’s hot-tempered. I got really hot about them not ​recycling.
  • hot adjective (GOOD)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) infml very good and having ​energy: Right now the ​stockmarket is hot. The show isn’t so hot. He doesn’t ​feel so hot.
  • hot adjective (STOLEN)

[not gradable] slang (of ​goods) ​stolen and ​thereforedifficult to ​sell: Those CD ​players are so ​cheap, they must be hot.
  • hot adjective (DANGEROUS)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) infml (of a ​situation) ​dangerous or ​difficult; ​risky: Things got a lot hotter when the ​military took over.
  • hot adjective (ATTRACTIVE)

[-er/-est only] (-tt-) slang physicallyattractive
(Definition of hot from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"hot" in British English

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hotadjective

uk   /hɒt/  us   /hɑːt/ (hotter, hottest)
  • hot adjective (VERY WARM)

A1 having a high ​temperature: a hot, ​sunnyday hot ​weather a hot ​drink/​meal It's too hot in here, can we ​turn down the ​heating? Bake the ​cake in a hot ​oven, about 220°C, for 30 ​minutes. The ​food was piping hot (= very hot).

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  • hot adjective (SPICY)

B1 used to ​describefood that ​causes a ​burningfeeling in the ​mouth: a hot ​curry hot, ​spicyfood
Opposite

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  • hot adjective (CAUSING DISAGREEMENT)

C1 used to ​describe a ​subject that ​causes a lot of ​disagreement or ​discussion: Global ​warming has ​become a very hot ​issue.
  • hot adjective (NEW/EXCITING)

C1 new and ​exciting: Hollywood's hottest new ​actress hot ​gossip This 21-year-old ​actor has ​become Hollywood's hottest property.

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  • hot adjective (MOST LIKELY)

hot tip informal an ​accuratepiece of ​advice about who will ​win a ​race: Do you have any hot ​tips for this afternoon's ​race?hot favourite UK the ​person or ​animal that is most ​likely to ​win a ​race, ​competition, ​election, etc.: He's the hot ​favourite towin the ​election.
  • hot adjective (SEXY)

informal sexuallyattractive, or ​feelingsexuallyexcited: She's really hot! I'm hot for you, ​baby. I've got a hot datetonight.
(Definition of hot from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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