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Definition of “indirect” - English Dictionary

"indirect" in American English

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indirectadjective

 us   /ˌɪn·dəˈrekt, ˌɪn·dɑɪ-/
  • indirect adjective (ADDITIONAL)

happening in ​addition to an ​intendedresult: Several other ​people were ​hurt as an indirect ​result of his ​carelessness.
  • indirect adjective (NOT STRAIGHT)

not ​following a ​straightline, or not ​connected in a ​simple way: an indirect ​route Ransom ​thought the ​bestapproach in ​defendingtruth is the indirect one.
(Definition of indirect from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"indirect" in British English

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indirectadjective

uk   /ˌɪn.daɪˈrekt/ /ˌɪn.dɪˈrekt/  us   /ˌɪn.daɪˈrekt/  /ˌɪn.dɪˈrekt/
  • indirect adjective (NOT OBVIOUS)

C2 happening in ​addition to an ​intendedresult, often in a way that is ​complicated or not ​obvious: The ​benefits from ​pureresearch are often indirect. Indirect ​effects of the ​fightingincludedisease and ​foodshortages.
avoidingclearlymentioning or saying something: indirect ​criticism
  • indirect adjective (NOT STRAIGHT)

C1 not ​following a ​straightline, or not ​directly or ​simplyconnected: to take an indirect ​route/​flight
indirectly
adverb uk   /ˌɪn.daɪˈrekt.li/ /ˌɪn.dɪˈrekt.li/  us   /ˌɪn.daɪˈrekt.li/  /ˌɪn.dɪˈrekt.li/
C1 She still ​controls the ​company indirectly through her ​son, who is the ​managingdirector.
(Definition of indirect from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"indirect" in Business English

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indirectadjective

uk   us   /ˌɪndɪˈrekt/
not done or communicated in a ​direct way: We decided to take an indirect ​approach to ​tackling the problem of ​absenteeism. He made only an indirect ​reference to what had ​happened at the ​meeting.
happening in ​addition to an intended ​result, often in a way that is complicated or not obvious: This is the indirect ​effect of a ​badbusinessclimate that discourages ​companies from ​expanding here. Incentives can ​pay for themselves through ​jobs and indirect ​benefits to the ​localeconomy. Here the ​deregulation affected the ​environment, but in a more indirect way.
indirectly
adverb /ˌɪndɪˈrektli/
Bosses were indirectly blamed for a ​stressfulenvironment.
(Definition of indirect from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“indirect” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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