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Definition of “instrument” - English Dictionary

"instrument" in American English

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instrumentnoun [C]

 us   /ˈɪn·strə·mənt/
  • instrument noun [C] (MUSIC)

an object, such as a piano, guitar, or flute, which is played to produce musical sounds: He plays saxophone, trumpet, and several other instruments.
  • instrument noun [C] (TOOL)

a tool or other device used for doing a particular piece of work: surgical instruments
(Definition of instrument from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"instrument" in British English

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instrumentnoun [C]

uk   /ˈɪn.strə.mənt/  us   /ˈɪn.strə.mənt/
  • instrument noun [C] (MUSIC)

A2 (also musical instrument) an object, such as a piano, guitar, or drum, that is played to produce musical sounds: Which instrument do you play?

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  • instrument noun [C] (TOOL)

C1 a tool or other device, especially one without electrical power, used for performing a particular piece of work: surgical instruments instruments of torture The man's injuries had obviously been caused by a blunt instrument.
a device used for measuring speed, height, etc. in vehicles, especially aircraft: the instrument panel The lightning had damaged the plane's instruments, and they weren't giving any readings.
C2 formal a way of achieving or causing something: He saw the theatre as an instrument of change - a way of forcing people to consider social and political issues.

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  • instrument noun [C] (FINANCE)

a type of investment in a company or in government debt that can be traded on the financial markets: They trade in the debt instruments of developing countries. increasingly complex financial instruments
(Definition of instrument from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"instrument" in Business English

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instrumentnoun [C]

(also financial instrument) uk   us   /ˈɪnstrəmənt/
FINANCE a financial asset that can be bought or sold, such as a bond, share, or other security : Fixed-income instruments include bonds, Treasury bills, and notes. This will still leave sufficient funds in low-risk instruments such as the debt market. Hedging instruments such as futures contracts are priced in dollars.
a tool, especially one without electrical power, used for performing a particular piece of work: surgical/precision/optical instrument The first optical instruments were telescopes.
a piece of equipment used for measuring speed, height, etc. in vehicles, especially aircraft: flight instruments
a way of achieving or causing something: The main instrument of change was the bank credit card.
LAW a legal document: This is a legal instrument and both claims will have to be decided by the English High Court.
(Definition of instrument from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“instrument” in Business English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
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by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

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