Definition of “intellectual” - English Dictionary

“intellectual” in British English

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intellectualadjective

uk /ˌɪn.təlˈek.tʃu.əl/ us /ˌɪn.t̬əlˈek.tʃu.əl/

B2 relating to your ability to think and understand things, especially complicated ideas:

Looking after a baby at home all day is nice but it doesn't provide much intellectual stimulation.
I like detective stories and romances - nothing too intellectual.

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intellectually
adverb uk /ˌɪn.təlˈek.tʃu.ə.li/ us /ˌɪn.t̬əlˈek.tʃu.ə.li/

C2

She's hoping to find a job which is more demanding intellectually.

intellectualnoun [ C ]

uk /ˌɪn.təlˈek.tʃu.əl/ us /ˌɪn.t̬əlˈek.tʃu.əl/

(Definition of “intellectual” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“intellectual” in American English

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intellectualadjective

us /ˌɪnt·əlˈek·tʃu·əl/

relating to the ability to think and understand ideas at a high level, or involving ideas:

He was among the political and intellectual leaders of his time.

intellectualnoun [ C ]

us /ˌɪn·təlˈek·tʃu·əl/

a person whose life or work centers around the study or use of ideas, such as in teaching or writing

(Definition of “intellectual” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“intellectual” in Business English

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intellectualadjective

uk /ˌɪntəlˈektjuəl/ us

relating to your ability to think and understand things, especially complicated ideas:

She takes an intellectual approach to decision-making, rather than just following her instincts.
I enjoy the intellectual challenge of the job.

(Definition of “intellectual” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)