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Definition of “introduce” - English Dictionary

"introduce" in American English

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introduceverb [T]

us   /ˌɪn·trəˈdus/
  • introduce verb [T] (MEET SOMEONE)

to arrange for you to meet and learn the name of another person: I’d like to introduce you to my friend, Sally. George, I’d like to introduce my friend, Sally.
To introduce is also to formally present someone to a group: It’s my distinct honor to introduce the president of the United States of America.
  • introduce verb [T] (BEGIN TO USE)

to put something into use for the first time, or to put something into a new place: When were music CDs first introduced? These trees were introduced into New England from Europe.
(Definition of introduce from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"introduce" in British English

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introduceverb [T]

uk   /ˌɪn.trəˈdʒuːs/ us   /ˌɪn.trəˈduːs/
  • introduce verb [T] (PUT INTO USE)

B2 to put something into use, operation, or a place for the first time: Apple has sold many millions of iPods since the product was introduced in 2001. Such unpopular legislation is unlikely to be introduced before the next election.specialized The tube which carries the laser is introduced into the abdomen through a small cut in the skin.

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  • introduce verb [T] (GIVE SB'S NAME)

B1 to tell someone another person's name the first time that they meet: I'd like to introduce my son, Mark. Have you two been introduced (to each other)?

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  • introduce verb [T] (BEGIN)

to be the beginning of something: A haunting oboe solo introduces the third movement of the concerto.
C2 to speak or write before the beginning of a performance, programme or book and give information about it; to tell an audience about the person who is going to speak, sing, etc. : The director will introduce the film personally at its premiere. This is the first official biography of her and it is introduced by her daughter. I'd now like to introduce our next guest, who will be singing songs from her latest album.

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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of introduce from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"introduce" in Business English

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introduceverb [T]

uk   /ˌɪntrəˈdjuːs/ us  
COMMERCE, MARKETING to make goods or services available to be bought for the first time: The company plans to introduce 45 new models over the next five years. The product range is being overhauled to introduce cheaper lines and more non-food products.
STOCK MARKET, FINANCE to make shares, etc. available for the first time: The shares moved higher to their highest level in the 21 years since this market introduced crude oil futures.
to start using a new system, rule, or method: We will introduce a 10p starting rate of income tax for individuals. The company introduced a jobshare scheme last year.
to tell someone another person's name the first time they meet: She plans to hold a meeting for all employees in the company to introduce her successor before she leaves.
LAW to formally suggest a new law to be discussed and voted on by a parliament: introduce a bill/measure He plans to introduce legislation that would set minimum standards for corporate disclosure in the US.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of introduce from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“introduce” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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