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Definition of “introduce” - English Dictionary

"introduce" in American English

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introduceverb [T]

 us   /ˌɪn·trəˈdus/
  • introduce verb [T] (MEET SOMEONE)

to ​arrange for you to ​meet and ​learn the ​name of another ​person: I’d like to introduce you to my ​friend, Sally. George, I’d like to introduce my ​friend, Sally.
To introduce is also to ​formallypresent someone to a ​group: It’s my ​distincthonor to introduce the ​president of the ​UnitedStates of ​America.
  • introduce verb [T] (BEGIN TO USE)

to put something into use for the first ​time, or to put something into a new ​place: When were ​musicCDs first introduced? These ​trees were introduced into New England from Europe.
(Definition of introduce from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"introduce" in British English

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introduceverb [T]

uk   /ˌɪn.trəˈdʒuːs/  us   /ˌɪn.trəˈduːs/
  • introduce verb [T] (PUT INTO USE)

B2 to put something into use, ​operation, or a ​place for the first ​time: Apple has ​sold many millions of iPods since the ​product was introduced in 2001. Such ​unpopularlegislation is ​unlikely to be introduced before the next ​election.specialized The ​tube which ​carries the ​laser is introduced into the ​abdomen through a ​smallcut in the ​skin.

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  • introduce verb [T] (GIVE SB'S NAME)

B1 to ​tell someone another person's ​name the first ​time that they ​meet: I'd like to introduce my ​son, ​Mark. Have you two been introduced (to each other)?

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  • introduce verb [T] (BEGIN)

to be the ​beginning of something: A ​hauntingoboesolo introduces the third ​movement of the ​concerto.
C2 to ​speak or write before the ​beginning of a ​performance, ​programme or ​book and give ​information about it; to ​tell an ​audience about the ​person who is going to ​speak, ​sing, etc. : The ​director will introduce the ​filmpersonally at ​itspremiere. This is the first ​officialbiography of her and it is introduced by her ​daughter. I'd now like to introduce ​our next ​guest, who will be ​singingsongs from her ​latestalbum.

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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of introduce from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"introduce" in Business English

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introduceverb [T]

uk   us   /ˌɪntrəˈdjuːs/
COMMERCE, MARKETING to make ​goods or ​servicesavailable to be ​bought for the first ​time: The ​companyplans to introduce 45 new ​models over the next five ​years. The ​productrange is being ​overhauled to introduce ​cheaperlines and more non-food ​products.
STOCK MARKET, FINANCE to make ​shares, etc. ​available for the first ​time: The ​sharesmovedhigher to their ​highestlevel in the 21 ​years since this ​market introduced ​crudeoilfutures.
to ​start using a new ​system, ​rule, or ​method: We will introduce a 10p ​startingrate of ​incometax for ​individuals. The ​company introduced a jobshare ​scheme last ​year.
to tell someone another person's ​name the first ​time they ​meet: She ​plans to ​hold a ​meeting for all ​employees in the ​company to introduce her ​successor before she ​leaves.
LAW to ​formally suggest a new ​law to be discussed and ​voted on by a ​parliament: introduce a ​bill/​measure He ​plans to introduce ​legislation that would set ​minimumstandards for ​corporatedisclosure in the US.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of introduce from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“introduce” in Business English

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