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Definition of “joint” - English Dictionary

"joint" in American English

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jointadjective [not gradable]

 us   /dʒɔɪnt/
belonging to or ​shared between two or more ​people: Do you and ​yourhusband have a joint ​bankaccount or ​separateaccounts? In ​court, the ​parents were ​awarded joint ​custody of ​theirson (= the ​right to ​care for him was ​shared between them).
joint venture
A joint ​venture is a ​business that gets ​itsmoney from two or more ​partners.
jointly
adverb [not gradable]  us   /ˈdʒɔɪnt·li/
Construction of the new high ​school will be jointly ​funded by the ​city and the ​state.

jointnoun [C]

 us   /dʒɔɪnt/
  • joint noun [C] (BODY PART)

a ​place in the ​body where two ​bonesmeet: Good ​runningshoes are ​supposed to ​reduce the ​stress on the ​ankle, ​knee, and ​hip joints.
  • joint noun [C] (CONNECTION)

a ​place where two things are ​joined together: Metal joints in the ​bridgeallow it to ​expand or ​contract with ​changes in ​airtemperature.
  • joint noun [C] (PLACE)

slang a ​cheaprestaurant: a ​hamburger joint
slang A joint is also a ​place where ​people go for some ​type of ​entertainment: a ​jazz joint
(Definition of joint from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"joint" in British English

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jointadjective

uk   /dʒɔɪnt/  us   /dʒɔɪnt/
B2 belonging to or ​shared between two or more ​people: a joint ​bankaccount The ​project was a joint ​effort between the two ​schools (= they ​worked on it together). The two ​Russianiceskaters came joint second (= they were both given second ​prize) in the ​worldchampionships. In ​court, the ​parents were ​awarded joint custody of ​theirson (= the ​right to ​care for him was ​shared between them).

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

jointly
adverb uk   /ˈdʒɔɪnt.li/  us   /ˈdʒɔɪnt.li/
C1 The Channel Tunnel was jointly ​funded by the ​French and British.

jointnoun [C]

uk   /dʒɔɪnt/  us   /dʒɔɪnt/
  • joint noun [C] (BODY)

C2 a ​place in ​yourbody where two ​bones are ​connected: an ​elbow/​hip/​knee joint As you ​becomeolder, ​your joints get ​stiffer.
put sth out of joint
to ​force a joint in the ​body out of ​itscorrectposition by ​accident: I put my ​shoulder out of joint last ​weekendliftingheavyboxes.
  • joint noun [C] (MEAT)

a ​largepiece of ​meat that is ​cooked in one ​piece: a joint of ​beef/​pork
a ​piece of ​meat for ​cooking, usually ​containing a ​bone: Fry four ​chicken joints in a ​pan with some ​mushrooms and ​garlic.
  • joint noun [C] (PLACE)

C1 informal a ​bar or ​restaurant that ​servesfood and ​drink at ​lowprices: We had ​lunch at a hamburger joint and then went to ​see a ​movie.
slang a ​place where ​people go for ​entertainment, ​especially one that has a ​badreputation: He ​owned several ​bars in the ​city and ​ran an ​illegal gambling joint. We ​arrived at the ​club just before ​midnight and the joint was already jumping (= ​busy).

jointverb [T]

uk   /dʒɔɪnt/  us   /dʒɔɪnt/
to ​cutmeat into ​largepiecesready for ​cooking
(Definition of joint from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"joint" in Business English

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jointadjective

uk   us   /dʒɔɪnt/
belonging to or ​shared between two or more ​people or ​organizations: a joint ​bankaccount The new Centre for Innovation was a joint ​effort between the ​privatesector, the ​publicsector, and several universities.
(Definition of joint from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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