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Definition of “judge” - English Dictionary

"judge" in American English

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judgenoun [C]

us   /dʒʌdʒ/
  • judge noun [C] (LAW)

a person who is in charge of a court of law: The judge dismissed the charge after a preliminary hearing.
  • judge noun [C] (PERSON WHO DECIDES)

a person who is qualified to form or give an opinion about something: a good judge of character
A judge is also a person who officially decides who has won a competition.

judgeverb [I/T]

us   /dʒʌdʒ/
  • judge verb [I/T] (DECIDE)

to have or give an opinion, or to decide about something or someone, esp. after thinking carefully: [I] He seems to be handling the job well, but it’s really too soon to judge. [+ question word] It’s hard to judge how old he is. [T] I’m hopeless at judging distances (= guessing how far it is between places). [T] What gives you the right to judge people (= decide how good or bad they are)?
To judge a competition is to decide officially who has won.
Judging by/from also to judge by/from
Judging by/from or to judge by/from refers to the reasons you have for thinking something: Judging by their home, they seem to be quite wealthy.
(Definition of judge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"judge" in British English

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judgenoun [C]

uk   /dʒʌdʒ/ us   /dʒʌdʒ/
  • judge noun [C] (PERSON)

B2 a person who is in charge of a trial in a court and decides how a person who is guilty of a crime should be punished, or who makes decisions on legal matters: a British high-court judge a US Supreme Court judge

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  • judge noun [C] (DECIDE)

B1 the person who officially decides who is the winner of a competition: a panel of judges
C2 a person who has the knowledge to give an opinion about something or is able to decide if someone or something is good or bad: She's such a bad judge of character. "I really don't think you should have another drink." "I'll be/Let me be the judge of that (= I am able to make my own decision about that)."

judgeverb [I or T]

uk   /dʒʌdʒ/ us   /dʒʌdʒ/
B1 to form, give, or have as an opinion, or to decide about something or someone, especially after thinking carefully: So far, he seems to be handling the job well, but it's really too soon to judge. [+ question word] It's difficult to judge whether the new system really is an improvement. The meeting was judged (to have been) a success. You shouldn't judge by/on appearances alone. I'm hopeless at judging distance(s) (= guessing how far it is between places).
C2 to express a bad opinion of someone's behaviour, often because you think you are better than them: You have no right to judge other people because of what they look like or what they believe.
C1 to officially decide who will be the winner of a competition: I've been asked to judge the children's poetry competition.
judging by/from also to judge by/from
B2 used to express the reasons why you have a particular opinion: Judging by what he said, I think it's very unlikely that he'll be able to support your application.

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(Definition of judge from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"judge" in Business English

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judgenoun [C]

uk   /dʒʌdʒ/ us  
LAW a person who is in charge of a court of law and who makes final decisions in legal disagreements: All three judges found him guilty of professional misconduct. a High Court/Supreme Court judge
someone who decides who should win a competition: A panel of judges chose six team projects as winners.

judgeverb

uk   /dʒʌdʒ/ us  
[I or T] to decide whether you think someone or something is good, bad, effective, etc.: Long-term investors have experience in judging risk.judging from/by sth Judging by the opinion polls, support for the mainstream right has hardly changed. judge whether/how/what Delegates must try to judge whether countries are meeting their quotas of greenhouse gas reductions.be judged to be/have Crops that are judged to have an overall benefit will be approved for planting.
[T] to decide who should win a competition: The same criteria are used to judge all contestants.
[T] LAW to make a final decision in a legal disagreement: be judged guilty/innocent of sth A disciplinary hearing judged them guilty of "gross misconduct".be judged to have done/be sth The company was judged to have broken antitrust laws and now faces a fine. I want the book to be judged on its merits, not on my reputation.
(Definition of judge from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“judge” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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