Definition of “judge” - English Dictionary

“judge” in British English

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judgenoun [ C ]

uk /dʒʌdʒ/ us /dʒʌdʒ/

judge noun [ C ] (PERSON)

B2 a person who is in charge of a trial in a court and decides how a person who is guilty of a crime should be punished, or who makes decisions on legal matters:

a British high-court judge
a US Supreme Court judge

More examples

  • The judge reminded the witness that she was under oath.
  • The judge will pronounce sentence on the defendant this afternoon.
  • In Britain, judges wear white wigs in court.
  • She wrote an article attacking the judges and their conduct of the trial.
  • He shouted abuse at the judge after being sentenced to five years imprisonment.

judge noun [ C ] (DECIDE)

B1 the person who officially decides who is the winner of a competition:

a panel of judges

C2 a person who has the knowledge to give an opinion about something or is able to decide if someone or something is good or bad:

She's such a bad judge of character.
"I really don't think you should have another drink." "I'll be/Let me be the judge of that (= I am able to make my own decision about that)."

judgeverb [ I or T ]

uk /dʒʌdʒ/ us /dʒʌdʒ/

B1 to form, give, or have as an opinion, or to decide about something or someone, especially after thinking carefully:

So far, he seems to be handling the job well, but it's really too soon to judge.
[ + question word ] It's difficult to judge whether the new system really is an improvement.
The meeting was judged (to have been) a success.
You shouldn't judge by/on appearances alone.
I'm hopeless at judging distance(s) (= guessing how far it is between places).

C2 to express a bad opinion of someone's behaviour, often because you think you are better than them:

You have no right to judge other people because of what they look like or what they believe.

C1 to officially decide who will be the winner of a competition:

I've been asked to judge the children's poetry competition.
judging by/from also to judge by/from

B2 used to express the reasons why you have a particular opinion:

Judging by what he said, I think it's very unlikely that he'll be able to support your application.

More examples

  • You shouldn't judge people by their external appearances .
  • Not everyone judges success by the same standards - some people think happiness is more important than money.
  • The competition will be judged by a panel of experts.
  • There are various points to look out for when you're judging dogs in a competition.
  • I can't really be objective when I'm judging my daughter's work.

(Definition of “judge” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“judge” in American English

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judgenoun [ C ]

us /dʒʌdʒ/

judge noun [ C ] (LAW)

a person who is in charge of a court of law:

The judge dismissed the charge after a preliminary hearing.

judge noun [ C ] (PERSON WHO DECIDES)

a person who is qualified to form or give an opinion about something:

a good judge of character

A judge is also a person who officially decides who has won a competition.

judgeverb [ I/T ]

us /dʒʌdʒ/

judge verb [ I/T ] (DECIDE)

to have or give an opinion, or to decide about something or someone, esp. after thinking carefully:

[ I ] He seems to be handling the job well, but it’s really too soon to judge.
[ + question word ] It’s hard to judge how old he is.
[ T ] I’m hopeless at judging distances (= guessing how far it is between places).
[ T ] What gives you the right to judge people (= decide how good or bad they are)?

To judge a competition is to decide officially who has won.

Judging by/from also to judge by/from

Judging by/from or to judge by/from refers to the reasons you have for thinking something:

Judging by their home, they seem to be quite wealthy.

(Definition of “judge” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“judge” in Business English

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judgenoun [ C ]

uk /dʒʌdʒ/ us

LAW a person who is in charge of a court of law and who makes final decisions in legal disagreements:

All three judges found him guilty of professional misconduct.
a High Court/Supreme Court judge

someone who decides who should win a competition:

A panel of judges chose six team projects as winners.

judgeverb

uk /dʒʌdʒ/ us

[ I or T ] to decide whether you think someone or something is good, bad, effective, etc.:

Long-term investors have experience in judging risk.
judging from/by sth Judging by the opinion polls, support for the mainstream right has hardly changed.
judge whether/how/what Delegates must try to judge whether countries are meeting their quotas of greenhouse gas reductions.
be judged to be/have Crops that are judged to have an overall benefit will be approved for planting.

[ T ] to decide who should win a competition:

The same criteria are used to judge all contestants.

[ T ] LAW to make a final decision in a legal disagreement:

be judged guilty/innocent of sth A disciplinary hearing judged them guilty of "gross misconduct".
be judged to have done/be sth The company was judged to have broken antitrust laws and now faces a fine.
I want the book to be judged on its merits, not on my reputation.

(Definition of “judge” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)