Definition of “jump” - English Dictionary

“jump” in British English

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jumpverb

uk /dʒʌmp/ us /dʒʌmp/

jump verb (IN THE AIR)

A2 [ I ] to push yourself suddenly off the ground and into the air using your legs:

The children were jumping up and down with excitement.
She ran across the grass and jumped into the water.
He had to jump out of an upstairs window to escape.
Our cat is always jumping up on/onto the furniture.

A2 [ I or T ] to push yourself suddenly off the ground in order to go over something:

Can you jump over/across this stream?
All the horses are finding it difficult to jump the last fence.

More examples

  • The children have jumped on the couch so much that they've ruined the springs.
  • In desperation, they jumped out of the window to escape the fire.
  • This will be her third try at jumping the bar.
  • My little daughter started jumping up and down with rage when she heard she couldn't go.
  • The rider was thrown as the horse jumped the fence.

jump verb (MOVE/ACT SUDDENLY)

B1 [ I usually + adv/prep ] to move or act suddenly or quickly:

He suddenly jumped to his feet/jumped up and left.
She jumped in/into a taxi and rushed to the station.

B2 [ I ] If a noise or action causes you to jump, your body makes a sudden sharp movement because of surprise or fear:

The loud explosion made everyone jump.
I almost jumped out of my skin when I heard a loud crash downstairs.

More examples

  • I jumped out of bed and ran downstairs.
  • He released the handbrake and the car jumped forwards.
  • I tore my sweaty clothes off and jumped into the shower.
  • Whenever anyone criticizes her husband, she immediately jumps to his defence.
  • I enjoyed the movie but I found it quite bitty, jumping from one family's story to another.

jump verb (INCREASE)

[ I ] to increase suddenly by a large amount:

House prices have jumped dramatically.
The cost of building the road has jumped by 70 percent.

More examples

  • The price of petrol suddenly jumped 5p per litre.
  • Tell the children to be careful because the depth of the water jumps quite unexpectedly.
  • This year my son's height has jumped dramatically - he's taller than his sister now.
  • The price of the shares jumped after the takeover announcement.
  • I wouldn't expect the interest rate to jump again for some time.

jump verb (MOVE ILLEGALLY)

[ T ] to go past or away from something illegally or wrongly:

The police video showed that she had jumped the (traffic) lights.
Several sailors jumped ship (= left their ship without permission) in New York.
jump bail

to fail to appear for a court trial after being released until the trial in exchange for payment:

I'd never have thought Hugh would jump bail.

jumpnoun [ C ]

uk /dʒʌmp/ us /dʒʌmp/

jump noun [ C ] (MOVEMENT)

B1 a sudden movement off the ground and into the air:

He won with a jump of 8.5 metres.
a parachute jump
Several horses fell at the last jump (= fence or other thing to be jumped over).

a sudden sharp movement because of surprise or fear:

The door slammed and Rita woke up with a jump.

More examples

  • Only one competitor made a clear jump of the highest fence.
  • She copped out of the parachute jump at the last minute with some feeble excuse.
  • The athlete's third, and winning, jump was an exhibition of skill and strength.
  • He needs a good jump to score more than 9000 pts.
  • I was going to do a parachute jump but I wimped out at the last minute.

(Definition of “jump” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“jump” in American English

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jumpverb

us /dʒʌmp/

jump verb (RAISE UP SUDDENLY)

[ I/T ] to push yourself off the ground and into the air using your legs and feet:

[ I ] The kids were jumping up and down with excitement.
[ I ] The cats jumped up onto the table.

[ I/T ] To jump sometimes means to lift yourself off the ground in order to go over something:

[ T ] Can you jump this fence?

jump verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[ I ] to move suddenly or quickly:

A man jumped out of the bushes.
He jumped to his feet and ran out the door.

[ I ] If a noise or action causes you to jump, your body makes a sudden movement because of surprise or fear:

The thunder made us all jump.
jumps the light

If a car jumps the light, it starts moving past a traffic light while the light is still red.

jump verb (OMIT STAGES)

[ I/T ] to move up or go across suddenly from one point or stage to another without stopping at the stages in between:

[ I always + adv/prep ] Her book jumped from fifth place to first place on the best-seller list.
[ T ] The forest fire jumped the road and spread to the other side.
jump to conclusions

If you jump to conclusions, you judge a situation quickly and emotionally without having all the facts:

It’s not fair to jump to conclusions about a whole group of people based on one incident.

jump verb (INCREASE)

[ I ] to increase suddenly by a large amount:

Home prices in the area have jumped to an all-time high.

jump verb (ATTACK)

[ T ] infml to attack suddenly:

He was jumped and robbed by two guys on his way home from work.

jumpnoun [ C ]

us /dʒʌmp/

jump noun [ C ] (RAISING UP SUDDENLY)

a push into the air from a surface, like the ground or ice, using your legs and feet:

The skater’s jump was high but not graceful.

jump noun [ C ] (OMITTING STAGES)

a move from one point or stage to another without stopping at the stages in between:

He made a big jump from general manager to president of the company.

(Definition of “jump” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“jump” in Business English

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jumpverb [ I ]

uk /dʒʌmp/ us

if prices, profits, shares, etc. jump, they increase by a large amount in a short period of time:

Interest rates look set to jump over the coming months.
jump from sth to sth The PMI index jumped from 54.5 to 56.1 in March, its highest level for six years.
jump (by) 31%/98 points/€116, etc. The airline's full-year pre-tax profits jumped 56% despite the impact of higher oil prices.
Overall music sales have jumped more than 19 percent in the last twelve months.
jump ship informal

to leave a company or organization in order to work for another, especially in order to get a higher salary or better working conditions:

Loyalty bonuses were paid to staff so they wouldn't jump ship.
jump on the bandwagon

to become involved in an activity that a lot of others are already involved in because it is successful:

More and more companies have jumped on the broadband discount bandwagon.

jumpnoun [ C ]

uk /dʒʌmp/ us

a sudden large increase in the price, value, or amount of something:

The tech stocks in the index posted the biggest jumps.
a jump in sth Universities and colleges have reported a dramatic jump in the number of applications.
a jump of 50%/150 points/€150, etc. Net casino revenues increased by 19% to $41 million, a jump of 138% over the fourth quarter of 2008.
a 25%/90 point/20 pence, etc. jump Heavyweight stock helped to drag the FTSE 100 higher with a 27.5p jump to 742p.
a jump from sth The increase in home repossessions, showing a 31% jump from last year's figures, is depressing property values.
a big/sharp/significant jump
get/have a jump on sb/sth US informal

to have an advantage over other companies or people:

Big companies are always looking to get a jump on their rivals.

(Definition of “jump” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)