just Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Definition of “just” - English Dictionary

Definition of "just" - American English Dictionary

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justadverb [not gradable]

 us   /dʒʌst, dʒəst/

just adverb [not gradable] (NOW)

now or (​almost) at the same ​time, or very ​soon, or very ​recently: He just ​left – if you ​run, you can ​catch him. It was just past (= very ​soon after)midnight. We got the ​children off to ​school just as the ​bus was about to ​leave. We’re just about to ​begin (= We will ​begin very ​soon). The ​doctor will ​see you in just a ​minute/​moment/second (= very ​soon).

just adverb [not gradable] (EXACTLY)

exactly: Beth ​looks just like her ​mother. [+ question word] It was just what I ​expected.

just adverb [not gradable] (ONLY)

only; ​simply: I’ll just ​check my ​e-mail, then we can go for ​coffee. I just called to ​wish you a ​happybirthday. We’ll just have to ​wait and ​see what ​happens. Just can be used to make a ​statementstronger: He just won’t ​listen to me.

just adverb [not gradable] (ALMOST)

almost not or ​almost: We ​arrived at the ​airport just in ​time to ​catch the ​plane. Matthew ​weighed just (= ​slightly) over seven ​pounds at ​birth. "Are you ​finishedyet?" "Just about."

just adverb [not gradable] (VERY)

very; ​completely: You ​look just ​wonderful! It’s just ​amazing how ​powerful the new ​computers are.


 us   /dʒʌst/

just adjective (FAIR)

morallycorrect; ​fair: a just ​verdict
(Definition of just from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "just" - British English Dictionary

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uk   us   /dʒʌst/

just adverb (NOW)

A2 now, very ​soon, or very ​recently: "Where are you, Jim?" "I'm just coming." I'll just ​finish this, then we can go. He'd just got into the ​bath when the ​phonerang. The ​childrenarrived at ​school just as (= at the same ​moment as) the ​bell was ​ringing. The ​doctor will be with you in just a ​minute/​moment/second (= very ​soon). It's just after/past (UK also gone) ten o'clock.just now A2 a very ​shorttime ago: Who was that at the ​door just now? at the ​presenttime: John's in the ​bath just now - can he ​call you back?
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just adverb (EXACTLY)

B1 exactly or ​equally: This ​carpet would be just ​right for the ​diningroom. The ​twinslook just like each other. Things ​turned out just as I ​expected. You've got just as many ​toys asyourbrother. Thank you, it's just what I've always ​wanted. I can't ​help you just now/​yet. Just then, the ​lights went out. I can just ​imagine Sophie as a ​policeofficer.informal approving That ​dress is just you (= ​suits you very well).
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just adverb (ONLY)

B1 only; ​simply: "Would you like another ​drink?" "OK, just one more." It was just a ​joke. His daughter's just a ​baby/just a few ​weeksold. We'll just have to (= the only thing we can do is)wait and ​see what ​happens. She ​lives just down the ​road (= very near). Just because you're ​older than me doesn't ​mean you can ​tell me what to do.B1 used to make a ​statement or ​orderstronger: He just won't do as he's told. It's just too ​expensive. used to ​reduce the ​force of a ​statement and to ​suggest that it is not very ​important: Can I just ​borrow the ​scissors for a second? I just ​wanted to ​ask you if you're ​free this ​afternoon.
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just adverb (ALMOST)

B1 almost not or ​almost: We ​arrived at the ​airport just in ​time to ​catch the ​plane. This ​dress (only) just ​fits. "Can you ​see the ​stage?" "Yes, only just/just about." I've just aboutfinishedpainting the ​livingroom.be just possible If something is just ​possible, there is a ​slightchance that it will ​happen: It's just ​possible that we might be going away that ​weekend.
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just adverb (VERY)

B1 very; ​completely: It's just ​dreadful what ​happened to her.
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uk   us   /dʒʌst/
C2 fair; ​morallycorrect: The judge's ​sentence was ​perfectly just in the ​circumstances. I don't really ​think he had just cause to ​complain.
adverb uk   us   /ˈdʒʌst.li/
He was justly ​condemned to a ​longprisonsentence. Kenji Mizoguchi is justly ​recognized as one of ​Japanese cinema’s ​greatestfigures.
noun [U] uk   us   /ˈdʒʌst.nəs/


uk   us   /dʒʌst/
the just formal people who ​behave in a ​morallycorrect way
(Definition of just from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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