keep Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “keep” - English Dictionary

Definition of "keep" - American English Dictionary

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keepverb

 us   /kip/ (past tense and past participle kept  /kept/ )

keep verb (POSSESS)

[T] to be in or ​continue to be in someone’s ​possession: Can I keep this ​photo? "Keep the ​change," she told the ​driver. We keep ​aspirin in the ​kitchen (= have it there for ​future use). [T] If you keep a diary or ​record, you write about ​events or ​recordinformation.

keep verb (DO)

[T] to do something you ​promised or had ​scheduled: I kept my ​promise. Did she keep her ​appointment? Can you keep a ​secret (= not ​tell other ​people)?

keep verb (STAY)

to ​stay or ​cause to ​stay or ​continue in a ​particularplace, ​direction, or ​condition: [L] keep ​left [L] keep ​quiet [L] It’s hard to keep ​cool in this ​weather. [T] Sorry to keep you ​waiting.

keep verb (CONTINUE DOING)

[T] to ​continue doing something without ​stopping, or to do it ​repeatedly: I keep ​thinking I’ve ​seen her ​somewhere before.

keep verb (STAY FRESH)

[I] (of ​food) to ​stayfresh and in good ​condition: Milk keeps ​longer in the ​refrigerator.
(Definition of keep from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "keep" - British English Dictionary

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keepverb

uk   us   /kiːp/ (kept, kept)

keep verb (CONTINUE TO HAVE)

A2 [T] to have or ​continue to have in ​yourpossession: Do you ​want this ​photograph back or can I keep it? Keep ​medicines in a ​lockedcupboard (= ​store them there).
See also
[T] to own and ​manage a ​smallshop: My ​uncle kept a little tobacconist's in Gloucester.B2 [T] If you keep ​animals, you own and take ​care of them, but not in ​yourhome as ​pets: to keep ​pigs/​goats/​chickens [T] US to ​watch and ​care for someone's ​children while ​theirparents are away: Jody will keep the ​children while I ​shop.keep your promise/word B2 to do what you have told someone that you would do: I made a ​promise to you and I ​intend to keep it.keep an appointment to go to a ​meeting or ​event that has been ​arranged: She ​phoned to say she couldn't keep her ​appointment.keep a diary, an account, a record, etc. B2 to make a ​regularrecord of ​events or other ​information so that you can refer to it ​later: I've kept a ​diary for twelve ​years now. Keep an ​account of how much you're ​spending.keep a secret B1 to not ​tell anyone a ​secret that you ​knowkeep time (of a ​watch or ​clock) to show the ​correcttime: Does ​yourwatch keep goodtime?keep goal to be the ​player who ​defendsyour team's ​goal by ​trying to ​preventplayers from the other ​teamscoringgoals
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keep verb (STAY)

A2 [L only + adj, T] to (​cause to) ​stay in a ​particularplace or ​condition: I ​wish you'd keep ​quiet. I like to keep ​busy. Keep ​left (= ​stay on the ​road to the ​left) at the ​trafficlights. Can you keep the ​dogoutside, ​please? [+ obj + adj ] Close the ​door to keep the ​roomwarm. The ​noise from ​theirparty kept me ​awakehalf the ​night.keep sth quiet to not ​tellpeople about something: They ​managed to keep the school's ​problemsquiet for a while. You're a ​qualifiedskiinginstructor? You kept that ​quiet!
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keep verb (CONTINUE DOING)

B1 [I + -ing verb] (also keep on) to ​continue doing something without ​stopping, or to do it ​repeatedly: He keeps ​trying to ​distract me. I keep on ​thinking I've ​seen her before ​somewhere. I kept ​hoping that he'd ​phone me.keep going to ​continue in the same way as before: If things keep going like this, we'll have to ​close the ​business. to ​continue to do something or to ​livenormally in a ​difficultsituation: Sometimes it was hard to keep going, but we did it for the children's ​sake.keep sb going to ​help someone to ​continue doing something or ​livingnormally, ​especially in a ​difficultsituation: It was my ​friends that kept me going through all this. informal to ​prevent someone from getting too ​hungry when they have to ​wait to ​eat a ​meal: Have a ​piece of ​fruit to keep you going.
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keep verb (DELAY)

B1 [T] to ​delay someone or ​prevent them from doing something: He's very late - what's keeping him? [+ -ing verb] I'm so ​sorry to keep you waiting. She kept me ​talking on the ​phone for ​half an ​hour. I ​hope I'm not keeping you up (= ​preventing you from going to ​bed). [I] If you say that ​news or ​information for someone can keep, you ​mean that you can ​tell it to them ​later: "I must ​tell you something." "Can't it keep? I'm in a ​hurry!" Whatever ​yournews is, it will keep.
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keep verb (STAY FRESH)

B2 [I] (of ​food) to ​stayfresh and in good ​condition: Milk keeps much ​longer in a ​fridge.

keep verb (PROVIDE)

C1 [T] to ​provide yourself or another ​person with ​food, ​clothing, a ​home, and other things ​necessary for ​basicliving: He ​wanted a ​job that would ​allow him to keep his ​family in ​comfort.

keepnoun

uk   us   /kiːp/

keep noun (LIVING EXPENSES)

[U] the ​cost of ​providingfood, ​heating, and other ​necessary things for someone: He's ​old enough now to earn his keep and ​stopliving off his ​parents.

keep noun (TOWER)

[C] specialized architecture the ​strongmaintower of a ​castle
(Definition of keep from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "keep" - Business English Dictionary

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keepverb

uk   us   /kiːp/ (kept, kept)
[T] to have or continue to have something, and not ​lose it or have to give it back to somebody: There is going to be a ​reorganization, but all the ​staff in the ​department will keep their jobs. On ​arrival, you will be given an ​informationpack, which is yours to keep. Please keep all ​invoicesrelating to the ​sale.
[T] to have ​available or for ​sale: We always keep a good ​supply of the most popular ​magazines.
[T] to ​store something in a particular ​place: Where do we keep the ​items that are not on ​display? They kept his details on ​file for future use.
[I or T] to ​stay, or make something ​stay, in a particular ​place or ​condition: When there's a ​crisis at ​work, it's important for ​managers to keep calm and be supportive.keep sth moving/working/operating You must keep the ​assemblylinemoving at a ​steadyrate. keep sth ​organized/​clean/​available The bank's ​policy is to keep ​interestrateslow.
[T] (also keep on) to continue to do something, or to do something again and again: He kept missing ​deadlines.keep (on) doing sth We kept on ​workinglong after everyone else had gone ​home.
[T] to own and ​manage a ​smallstore: His father kept a candy ​store in this ​neighborhood.
[I] if ​food keeps, it ​stays fresh and in good ​condition: This ​variety of apple keeps well.
keep an account/a record/a note to make a ​record of ​events or other ​information so that you can refer to it later: We keep a ​record of every ​sale in this ​database. Always keep an ​account of how much you're ​spending.
keep an appointment to go to a ​meeting or ​event that has been ​arranged: She ​phoned to say she couldn't keep her ​appointment.
keep sth to yourself to not tell other ​people about something: My ​bossasked me to keep the ​information to myself until she could announce it ​formally.
keep sth under control to ​check something, and make sure that it ​stays within a ​certainlimit: You must ensure that ​productioncosts are kept under ​control.
(Definition of keep from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“keep” in Business English

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