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Definition of “know” - English Dictionary

"know" in American English

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knowverb

 us   /noʊ/ (past tense knew  /nu/ , past participle known  /noʊn/ )
  • know verb (HAVE INFORMATION)

[I/T] to have ​information in ​yourmind; to be ​aware of something: [I] “Where did he go?” “I don’t know.” [T] Do you know the ​answer? [T] She knows the ​name of every ​kid in ​school. [+ question word] Do you know how to ​tapdance? [+ question word] We don’t know when he’s ​arriving. [+ (that) clause] I knew (that) something was ​wrong from the ​start. [+ question word] I ​want to know how much this will ​cost.
know of
If you know of someone or something, you have ​experience of or ​information about the ​person or thing: Do you know of a good ​doctor?
  • know verb (HAVE UNDERSTANDING)

[I/T] to ​agree with or ​understand the ​reasons for an ​action or ​opinion: [+ question word] I don’t know what all the ​fuss is about. [+ question word] “What a ​stupidmovie!” “I know what you ​mean.”
know what it is (like) to
To know what it is (like) to be or do something is to ​understand because you have ​personallyexperienced it: She knows what it’s like to go ​bankrupt – it ​happened to her 20 ​years ago.
  • know verb (BE FAMILIAR WITH)

[I/T] to be ​familiar with a ​person or ​place: [T] I’ve known Vince since we were in ​elementaryschool. [T] She ​grew up in Hawaii so she knows it well. [T] Knowing Debbie (= from my ​experience of her in the past), she’ll do a good ​job.
  • know verb (FEEL CERTAIN)

[T] to ​feelcertain about something: I know I’d ​enjoy myself if I went. [+ (that) clause] I know (that) I took those ​librarybooks back. [+ wh- word] I don’t know whether or not I should go to ​college.
[T] to ​feelcertain about something: I know I’d ​enjoy myself if I went. [+ (that) clause] I know (that) I took those ​librarybooks back. [+ question word] I don’t know whether or not I should go to ​college.
  • know verb (RECOGNIZE)

[T] to ​recognize someone or something, or to ​recognize the ​difference between two ​people or things: That’s Pete – I’d know him ​anywhere. I know a ​bargain when I ​see one!

knownoun

 us   /noʊ/
  • know noun (HAVE INFORMATION)

in the know
Someone who is in the know has ​information about something: Ask Keith – he’s always in the know about ​upcomingprojects.
(Definition of know from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"know" in British English

See all translations

knowverb

uk   /nəʊ/  us   /noʊ/ (knew, known)
  • know verb (HAVE INFORMATION)

A1 [I or T, not continuous] to have ​information in ​yourmind: "Where did he go?" "I don't know." "What does it ​cost?" "Ask Kate. She'll know." She knows the ​name of every ​kid in the ​school. I don't know anything about this. [+ question word] We don't know when he's ​arriving. I don't know (= ​understand) what all the ​fuss is about. [+ (that)] I just knew (that) it was going to be a ​disaster. She knew (= was ​aware) (that) something was ​wrong. [+ obj + to infinitive ] Even ​smallamounts of these ​substances are known tocauseskinproblems.formal The ​authorities know him to be (= know that he is) a ​cocainedealer.
A1 [T not continuous] used to ​ask someone to ​tell you a ​piece of ​information: Do you know the ​time? [+ question word] Do you know where the Post ​Office is?
A2 [I or T, not continuous] to be ​certain: [+ (that)] I know (that) she'll be really ​pleased to ​hear the ​news. [+ question word] I don't know whether I should ​tell her or not. The ​party is at Sarah's ​house as/so ​far as I know (= I ​think but I am not ​certain).

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  • "Will the ​tablefit in here?" "I don't know - let's ​measure it."
  • I still don't know whether she's coming or not.
  • It's a ​bitsuspicious that no one knows where he was at the ​time of the ​murder.
  • No one knew how many ​troops had ​died in ​combat.
  • "He's been ​married three ​times." "Oh, really? I didn't know that!"
  • know verb (BE FAMILIAR WITH)

B1 [T not continuous] to be ​familiar with or have ​experience and ​understanding of: I've known Daniel since we were at ​school together. She ​grew up in Paris so she knows it well. I've ​seen the ​film "Casablanca" so many ​times that I know a lot of it by ​heart (= I know it in my ​memory). Knowing Karen (= from my ​experience of her in the past), she'll have done a good ​job.formal I have known (= ​experienced)greathappiness in my ​life.
B1 [I or T, not continuous] (also know about) If you know a ​subject, you are ​familiar with it and ​understand it: Do you know aboutcomputers? She knows her ​subject inside out (= very well).
A2 [T not continuous] If you know a ​language, you can ​speak and ​understand it: Do you know any ​French?
[T not continuous] to ​recognize someone or something: That's Peter ​alright - I'd know him ​anywhere! I know a ​bargain when I ​see one.
know how to do sth
A2 to be ​able to do something because you have the ​necessaryknowledge: Do you know how to ​print on this ​computer?
get to know sb/sth
B1 to ​spendtime with someone or something so that you ​graduallylearn more about him, her, or it: The first ​couple of ​meetings are for the ​doctor and ​patient to get to know each other. I'll need a few ​weeks to get to know the ​system.
know sb by name
to have ​heard the ​name of a ​person but not ​seen or ​talked to them
know sb by sight
If you know someone by ​sight, that ​personlooksfamiliar to you, but is not a ​friend of yours.

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knownoun

uk   /nəʊ/  us   /noʊ/ informal
(Definition of know from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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