Definition of “label” - English Dictionary

“label” in British English

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labelnoun [ C ]

uk /ˈleɪ.bəl/ us /ˈleɪ.bəl/

label noun [ C ] (SIGN)

B1 a piece of paper or other material that gives you information about the object it is attached to:

Remember to put some address labels on the suitcases.
Washing instructions should be on the label.

C2 a word or a phrase that is used to describe the characteristics or qualities of people, activities, or things, often in a way that is unfair:

He seems to be stuck with the label of "troublemaker".

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label noun [ C ] (COMPANY)

B1 a company that produces goods for sale, the goods themselves, or the company's name or symbol:

Her favourite designer label (= maker of expensive clothes) is Armani.
Their own-label vegetarian products have been a huge success.
The group have just signed (= arranged to record) with a new record label.

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labelverb [ T ]

uk /ˈleɪ.bəl/ us /ˈleɪ.bəl/ -ll- or US usually -l-

C1 to fasten a label to:

[ + adj ] The parcel was clearly labelled "Fragile".
If you spend any time in prison, you're labelled as a criminal for the rest of your life.

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(Definition of “label” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“label” in American English

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labelnoun [ C ]

us /ˈleɪ·bəl/

a piece of paper or other material that gives information about the object it is attached to:

the address/mailing label
Follow the instructions on the label.

A label can also mean the name or symbol of a company that produces goods for sale:

Everything we produce goes out under our own label.

A label can also be a name or a phrase used to describe the characteristics or qualities of people, activities, or things:

It’s hard to say whether to apply the label “jazz” or “rock” to her music.

labelverb [ T ]

us /ˈleɪ·bəl/

to attach a piece of paper or other material that has information about an object to that object:

She labeled all the packages and sent them out the same afternoon.

To label something or someone is also to name that thing’s or person’s character:

He didn’t want to be labeled a complainer, so he didn’t raise any objection to the extra work.

(Definition of “label” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“label” in Business English

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labelnoun [ C ]

uk /ˈleɪbəl/ us COMMERCE, MARKETING

a piece of paper or other material that gives you information about the object that it is fixed to:

address/price/warning label Canada put graphic warning labels on cigarette packs back in June 2001.
Food packages that did not carry a label certifying them as safe were being blocked from export.
Launder or dry-clean, according to the care label.
Check the sodium levels on the food label.

a company that produces goods for sale, using a particular name:

designer/fashion label She also has plans to launch a range of cosmetics if her fashion label takes off.

a name of a record company:

a name of a company that makes wine:

Among its other big deals this year was the purchase of two champagne labels.

a name or symbol that is used by a company to sell its products, or the products themselves:

Contaminated wheat gluten made its way into pet food sold under nearly 100 labels across North America.

labelverb [ T ]

uk /ˈleɪbəl/ us UK -ll-, US -l-

COMMERCE, MARKETING to fasten a label to something, or write information on something:

All food products are labelled with their price and country of origin.
be labelled as sth Only clothes with a UPF of 15 to 50-plus may be labeled as sun-protective.
Processed foods must be clearly labeled to indicate fat, sugar, and salt content for shoppers.

to describe someone or something using a particular word or phrase, often unfairly:

She doesn't like being labelled as a "woman director", saying she's just a director who happens to be a woman.

(Definition of “label” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)