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Definition of “leap” - English Dictionary

"leap" in American English

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leapverb [I/T]

 us   /lip/ (past tense and past participle leaped  /lipt, lept/ or leapt  /lept/ )
to make a ​largejump or ​suddenmovement, or to ​jump over something: [I] He leaps to his ​feet when the ​phonerings. [I] Flames were leaping into the ​sky. [T] The ​dog leaped the ​fence. [I] fig.Americanswantchange, but they don’t ​want to leap into the ​unknown (= move ​quickly into ​unknownsituations). If ​yourheart leaps, you have a ​sudden, ​strongfeeling of ​pleasure or ​fear: [I] My ​heart leaps when I ​hear his ​voice.
Phrasal verbs

leapnoun [C]

 us   /lip/
a ​largejump
(Definition of leap from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"leap" in British English

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leapverb [I + adv/prep]

uk   us   /liːp/ (leaped or leapt, leaped or leapt)
C2 to make a ​largejump or ​suddenmovement, usually from one ​place to another: He leaped out of his ​car and ​ran towards the ​house. I leaped up to ​answer the ​phone. The ​dog leaped over the ​gate into the ​field.

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to ​providehelp, ​protection, etc. very ​quickly: He leaped to his friend's ​defence. Scott leapt to the ​rescue when he ​spotted the ​youngster in ​difficulty. Mr Davies leaped in to ​explain. to ​achieve something ​suddenly, usually fame, ​power, or ​importance: He leapt tofame after his ​appearance in a Broadway ​play. to ​increase, ​improve, or ​grow very ​quickly: Shares in the ​company leaped 250 ​percent.

leapnoun [C]

uk   us   /liːp/
(Definition of leap from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"leap" in Business English

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leapverb [I]

uk   us   /liːp/ (leapt or leaped /lept/ , leapt or leaped /lept/ )
to ​increase, ​improve, or ​grow very quickly: exports/prices/profits leap Property ​prices have leapt over 30% in the past ​year.leap (to sth) The company's ​shares leapt 17.5p to 210p.

leapnoun [C]

uk   us   /liːp/
a ​bigchange, ​increase, or ​improvement: a leap in costs/profits/sales The ​softwaredesigner should ​report a near 40% leap in ​profits to around £124m.a leap forward for sb/sth This ​launchrepresents a great leap ​forward for the ​company.a 20%/40%/75%, etc. leap The ​healthinsurancegiantreported a 20% leap in pre-tax ​profits for the ​year.
See also
(Definition of leap from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“leap” in Business English

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