Definition of “leverage” - English Dictionary

“leverage” in English

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leveragenoun [ U ]

uk /ˈliː.vər.ɪdʒ/ us /ˈlev.ɚ.ɪdʒ/

leverage noun [ U ] (BUSINESS)

specialized finance & economics the relationship between the amount of money that a company owes to banks and the value of the company

specialized finance & economics the act of using borrowed money to buy an investment or a company:

With leverage, the investor's $100,000 buys $500,000 or more of stock if he wants.
Synonym

leverageverb [ T ]

uk /ˈliː.vər.ɪdʒ/ us /ˈlev.ɚ.ɪdʒ/

leverage verb [ T ] (USE)

to use something that you already have in order to achieve something new or better:

We can gain a market advantage by leveraging our network of partners.

leverage verb [ T ] (BUSINESS)

specialized finance & economics to use borrowed money to buy an investment or company:

Home equity is invaluable if you leverage it to build wealth.

specialized finance & economics to use money to get more money:

One of the easiest ways to leverage a charitable gift is to get your employer to match it.
leveraged
adjective uk /ˈliː.vər.ɪdʒd/ us /ˈlev.ɚ.ɪdʒd/

The company is highly leveraged and struggling with interest payments.

(Definition of “leverage” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“leverage” in American English

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leveragenoun [ U ]

us /ˈlev·ər·ɪdʒ, ˈli·vər-/

the power to influence results:

The US has very little leverage in that part of the world.

leverageverb [ T ]

us /ˈlev·ə·rɪdʒ, ˈli·və-/

to use borrowed money for investments, esp. in order to buy a large enough part of a business so that you can control it:

They can leverage a very small investment into millions of dollars.

(Definition of “leverage” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“leverage” in Business English

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leveragenoun [ U ]

uk /ˈliːvərɪdʒ/ us /ˈlevərɪdʒ/

the power to influence people and get the results you want:

This gives advertisers more leverage when it comes time to negotiate rates.
Campaigners are trying to get as much political leverage on the situation as possible.
States do not have the economic leverage to influence a foreign country.
Labor experts say a service economy can give leverage to unionized workers.

FINANCE the relationship between the amount of money that a company owes and its share capital or value:

The company plans to reduce the leverage to between 40% and 60% by the year end.
The bank was asked to improve its capitalization and reduce its leverage.
The figure shows that they had high growth rates of bank lending and high leverage.
Even if banks were able to rush back into heavy leverage soon, investors wouldn't stand for it.
Compare

FINANCE the act of using borrowed money to buy an investment or a company:

With leverage, the investor's $100,000 buys $500,000 or more of stock if he wants.

leverageverb [ T ]

uk /ˈliːvərɪdʒ/ us /ˈlevərɪdʒ/

to use something that you already have, such as a resource, in order to achieve something new or better:

This new strategy is about leveraging the relationships we have with our customers.
leverage sth into sth If you enjoy the work, it should be possible to leverage your temporary assignment into a full-time job.

FINANCE to use borrowed money to buy an investment or a company:

The money could be used to leverage millions of additional dollars.
leveraging
noun [ U ]

FINANCE

Through aggressive leveraging, it grew into one of the largest private enterprises in the country.

Phrasal verb(s)

(Definition of “leverage” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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leverage

Apart from the multilateral talks, an important way to overcome these barriers is through the leverage available to us in free trade agreement negotiations.
When leverage or risk is employed, we should be sanctioning the risk limits, as ultimately any default means that it is the taxpayer who will pay again.
The problem of liquidity and leverage ratios has not been resolved, any more than that of off-balance sheet assets and securitisation.
We are considering measures that best use public investment to leverage additional private investment, such as the creation of a specific facility for large-scale demonstration projects.
An innovation policy that is consistent and integrated, and has a long-term vision will enable us to leverage strengths and resolve weaknesses detected at regional level.
We are asking for disclosure of leverage/debt exposure, the source and amount of funds raised and identification of shareholders for all investment projects.
We need to ensure that we have strong minimum reserves and complete transparency, particularly with regard to the leverage that financial institutions are exerting.
The leverage it was able to exert was $ 200 billion initially; then the other estimates are somewhere in excess of one trillion dollars.
Because of the exceptionally high leverage and the scale of linkages between risks, this process of unwinding is proving particularly painful.
Once this directive has come into force, it will punish authorities which are bad payers and offer business people important leverage for recovering their debts.