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Definition of “lift” - English Dictionary

"lift" in American English

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liftverb

us   /lɪft/
  • lift verb (RAISE)

[I/T] to move something from a lower to a higher position: [T] I can’t lift you up – you’re a big boy now! [I always + adv/prep] The top of the stool lifts off (= can be removed) so you can store things in it. [T] She lifted the baby out of her chair. [T] fig. Nothing, it seemed, could lift his spirits (= make him feel happier).
  • lift verb (GO AWAY)

[I] (of fog or rain) to go away until none is left: The morning mist had lifted and the sun was shining.
  • lift verb (END)

[T] to end a rule or law: They finally lifted the ban on baggy jeans at my school.
  • lift verb (STEAL)

[T] infml to steal something: He lifted whole paragraphs verbatim from my book.

liftnoun [C]

us   /lɪft/
  • lift noun [C] (JOURNEY)

infml a free trip in another person’s vehicle, esp. a car: Can I give you a lift home?
  • lift noun [C] (RAISE)

Br A lift is an elevator.
(Definition of lift from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"lift" in British English

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liftverb

uk   /lɪft/ us   /lɪft/
  • lift verb (RAISE)

B1 [T] to move something from a lower to a higher position: Could you help me lift this table, please? Could you lift your chair a little- I've got my coat caught under it. She lifted the cigarette (up) to her lips. He lifted his eyes (= looked up) from the paper and glared.
lift a/the cup
to win a race or competition in which the prize is a metal cup: He is the hot favourite to lift the cup again next month.
[T] specialized biology to dig underground vegetables or plants out of the ground: They're lifting potatoes.

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  • lift verb (TAKE HOLD)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] to take hold of and raise something in order to remove, carry, or move it to a different position: She lifted the baby out of her chair. He lifted the box carefully down from the shelf.

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  • lift verb (GO AWAY)

[I] (of mist or fog) to go away until none is left: The morning mist had lifted and the sun was starting to come through.
  • lift verb (STEAL)

[T] informal to steal something
[T] informal to use someone else's writing, music, or idea, pretending that it is your own: He'd lifted whole passages from a website.

liftnoun

uk   /lɪft/ us   /lɪft/
  • lift noun (CARRYING DEVICE)

A2 [C] UK US elevator a device like a box that moves up and down, carrying people or goods from one floor of a building to another or taking people up and down underground in a mine: Take the lift to the sixth floor.

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  • The lift isn't working.
  • We got stuck in the lift.
  • Take the lift to the top floor.
  • We went up in the lift.
  • He is scared to go in lifts.
  • lift noun (RAISE)

[C or U] an act of lifting or raising something: Give it one more lift and we'll have it at the top of the stairs.
[U] specialized engineering the force on the wing of a bird or aircraft that keeps it in the air as it moves forward
(Definition of lift from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"lift" in Business English

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liftverb [T]

uk   /lɪft/ us  
ECONOMICS, FINANCE to make the amount or level of something rise: Low interest rates may lift consumer confidence. The group's shares were lifted 5.25p to 170p by the news. Economists said that the cash probably helped lift the economy out of recession. lift sales/prices/profits
to move something from a lower to a higher position: They use a crane to lift the containers onto the ship.
GOVERNMENT, POLITICS to end a rule or law: Federal officials will lift an order grounding all small planes. lift a ban/an embargo/sanctions

liftnoun [C]

uk   /lɪft/ us  
[usually singular] an increase: a lift in sth Local stores saw a lift in sales. That gave the dollar a lift against the yen.
UK US elevator WORKPLACE a device like a box that moves up and down, carrying people or goods from one floor of a building to another: Visitors normally take the lift to the reception level one floor below.in the lift I came up in the lift with the company Chairman.
(Definition of lift from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“lift” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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