like Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “like” - English Dictionary

Definition of "like" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

likeverb

 us   /lɑɪk/

like verb (ENJOY)

[T] to ​enjoy or ​approve of something or someone, or to ​prefer something a ​particular way: I like ​your new ​haircut. Do you like ​fish? I like taking my ​time in the ​morning. I like my ​musicloud. [T] Like can be used with "how" when ​asking for someone’s ​reaction to something: How do you like my new ​shoes?

like verb (WANT)

[I/T] to ​want something: [T] I’d like the ​chickensoup, ​please. [+ to infinitive] The ​commissioner would like to say ​thanks to everyone who’s ​helped. [T] Would you like (= Do you ​want) something to ​drink? Note: Used with "would" to ask for something or express something in a polite way.
liking
noun [U]  us   /ˈlɑɪ·kɪŋ/
The ​dessert was a ​bitsweet for my liking.

likepreposition, conjunction

 us   /lɑɪk/

like preposition, conjunction (SIMILAR TO)

similar to; in the same way or ​manner as: I’ve got a ​sweater just like yours. Stop ​acting like a ​jerk! She ​looks just like her ​father. infmlLike I said (= As I already said), I’m not ​interested in ​buyinginsurance at the ​moment. If you ​ask what something is like, you are ​asking someone to ​describe it or ​compare it to something: What’s ​your new ​job like? What does it ​taste like?

like preposition, conjunction (AS IF)

as if it will or was; in a way that ​suggests: It ​looks like ​rain. It ​sounds to me like you ought to ​changejobs.

likenoun [U]

 us   /lɑɪk/
someone ​similar to another ​person or something ​similar to another thing: Planners ​unveileddesigns for a multibillion-dollar ​culturaldistrict whose like has never been ​seen before.

likepreposition

 us   /lɑɪk/

like preposition (WILLING TO)

willing to; in the ​mood for: I don’t ​feel like going out ​tonight.

like preposition (TYPICAL OF)

typical or ​characteristic of; to be ​expected of: It’s not like you to be so ​quiet – are you all ​right?

like preposition (SUCH AS)

such as; for ​example: I ​prefernaturalfabrics like ​cotton and ​wool. Alonzo is not the ​kind of ​guy who would do something like this.

likeadverb [not gradable]

 us   /lɑɪk/ not standard

like adverb [not gradable] (PAUSE)

used in ​conversation to ​emphasize what ​follows, or when you cannot ​expressyourexactmeaning: He’s, like, really ​friendly – someone you can ​talk to. It was, like, getting ​pretty late but I didn’t ​want to go ​homeyet. Like is also used in ​conversation to ​introduce someone else’s words or ​your own words: So I’m ​telling Patti about my ​class and she’s like, No way, and I’m like, It ​happened.
(Definition of like from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "like" - British English Dictionary

See all translations

likeverb [T]

uk   us   /laɪk/

like verb [T] (ENJOY)

A1 to ​enjoy or ​approve of something or someone: I like ​your new ​haircut. Do you like ​fish? I like it when a ​book is so good that you can't put it down. I ​quite like ​wine but I could ​live without it. He's very well-liked (= ​popular) at ​work. I like the way he just ​assumes we'll ​listen to him when he doesn't take in a word anyone ​else says! (= I don't like it and it ​annoys me.) [+ -ing verb] I don't like upsettingpeople. [+ to infinitive] He likes tospend his ​evenings in ​front of the ​television. [+ past participle] He likes his ​steakwell-done. to show that you ​think something is good on a socialnetworkingwebsite by clicking on a ​symbol or the word 'like': Like us on ​Facebook! More than 200 ​people liked my ​post.
More examples

like verb [T] (WANT)

would like (or formal should like...)
More examples
A1 used to say ​politely that you ​want something: I ​think I'd like the ​soup for my ​starter. I'd like to go to Moscow. I would like to say a ​bigthank you to everyone who's ​helped to make ​ourwedding such a ​specialoccasion!
A1 used in ​requests: I'd like one of the round ​loaves, ​please. [+ to infinitive] I'd like tobook a ​seat for tonight's ​performance. [+ obj + to infinitive ] I'd like you tosend this for me, ​please. [+ past participle] I would like the ​whole lot ​finished by the ​weekend.

likepreposition, conjunction

uk   us   /laɪk/

like preposition, conjunction (SIMILAR TO)

A2 similar to; in the same way or ​manner as: He looks like his ​brother. She's very much like her ​mother (= she is ​similar in ​appearance or ​character). Is ​Japanesefood like ​Chinese? I've got a ​sweater just like that. Her ​hair was so ​soft it was like ​silk. You're ​acting like a ​completeidiot! She ​sings like an ​angel! Like I said (= as I have already said), I don't ​wearperfume. Like most ​people (= as most ​people would), I'd ​prefer to have enough ​money not to ​work. It feels/​seems like (= it ​seems to me)ages since we last ​spoke. There's nothing like a good ​cup of ​coffee (= it's ​better than anything)!
More examples

like preposition, conjunction (AS IF)

B1 in a way that ​suggests: It looks like I'm going to be in the ​office until late ​tonight. It ​looks like ​rain (= I ​think it is going to ​rain). It sounds to me like you ought to ​changejobs. You ​look like you've just got out of ​bed!not standard She ​acts like she's ​stupid!
More examples
Grammar

likepreposition

uk   us   /laɪk/

like preposition (TYPICAL OF)

B2 typical or ​characteristic of: That's just like Maisie to ​turn up ​half an ​hour late to her own ​party! It's not like you to be so ​quiet - are you all ​right, my ​love?
More examples

like preposition (SUCH AS)

B1 such as: She ​looksbest in ​bright, ​vibrantcolours, like ​red and ​pink.
More examples

likeadverb

uk   us   /laɪk/ informal

like adverb (FEELINGS/SPEECH)

used before you ​describe how you were ​feeling or what you said when something ​happened to you: Then I ​saw how late it was and I'm like, so ​upset. He ​startedshouting at me and I'm like, "What's ​yourproblem? I'm on ​yourside!"

like adverb (PAUSE)

used in ​conversation as a ​pause or to ​emphasize an ​adjective: He's, like, really ​friendly - someone you can ​talk to. If there's nothing you can do to ​change the ​situation, it's like - why ​bother?

likenoun

uk   us   /laɪk/
the like of sb/sth; sb's/sth's like (also the likes of sb/sth) a ​person, thing, or ​groupsimilar in ​character or ​quality to the one ​mentioned: Boxing hasn't seen the likes of Muhammad Ali since he ​retired. He was a very ​greatactor - we won't see his like again. He ​described a ​superlativemeal, the like of which he'd never ​eaten before. They're ​competing with the likes of Microsoft.and such like (also and the like) informal and ​similar things: There's a ​bigsportshall for ​tennis and ​badminton and such like.likes B2 [plural] the things that someone ​enjoys: The ​starlists his likes as "my new Porsche, my ​girlfriend, and ​staying up all ​night." They can't ​expect me to ​accommodate all ​theirsilly little likes and ​dislikes.not for the likes of sb (also like) informal not for the ​type of ​peoplementioned: First-class ​travel is for ​richpeople - it's not for the likes of us. [C] (on a ​page on a socialnetworkingwebsite) an ​act of ​showing that you ​think something is good by clicking a ​button: My new ​profilepicture got 100 likes.

likeadjective

uk   us   /laɪk/

-likesuffix

uk   us   /-laɪk/
like the thing ​mentioned: The ​papercriticized what it ​described as the animal-like ​behaviour of the ​fans. There was a ​large, ball-like ​structure on ​top of the ​building. childliketrust a cabbage-like ​vegetable
(Definition of like from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of like?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

chestnut

a large tree with leaves divided into five parts and large round nuts that can be eaten

Word of the Day

In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
In London but at the station: prepositions for talking about travel
by Liz Walter,
September 02, 2015
Several readers have asked for information on prepositions, so I will start with a blog post that looks at an area where they are really important: travel. The first thing to remember is that we use to (and not ‘in’) after the verb go: We are going to London. I went to

Read More 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Read More