line Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “line” - English Dictionary

Definition of "line" - American English Dictionary

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linenoun

 us   /lɑɪn/

line noun (LONG MARK)

[C] a ​long, ​thinmark on the ​surface of something: Draw a ​straight line. You shouldn’t ​driveacross the ​doubleyellow lines. As I ​growolder, lines and ​wrinkles show on my ​face. geometry [C] A line is a ​row of points that ​continues in both ​directions and is usually ​represented by a ​longthinmark.

line noun (EDGE)

[C] a ​real or ​imaginarymark that ​forms the ​edge, ​border, or ​limit of something: The ​policecaught him before he crossed the ​state line. [C] A line is also a ​mark on a ​sportsfield which ​shows where things can or cannot ​happen, or which ​measures the ​field: the ​foul line the 50-yard line the free-throw line

line noun (STRING)

[C] a ​length of ​string, ​rope, or ​wire that is used to ​support something: fishing line Would you ​help me ​hang the ​wash out on the line?

line noun (ROW)

[C] a ​row of ​people or things: There was a ​long line at the ​movietheater. Just get in/on line and ​waityourturn. [C] In ​football, the lines are the two ​frontrows of ​opposingplayers who ​face one another at the ​start of a ​play: the ​offensive/​defensive line

line noun (SERIES)

[C usually sing] a ​series of ​people, esp. ​members of the same ​family, ​following one another in ​time: He comes from a ​long line of ​doctors.

line noun (MILITARY)

[C] a ​row of ​militarypositions, ​particularly the ​onesclosest to ​enemypositions: the ​front line behind ​enemy lines

line noun (WIRE/CONNECTION)

[C] an ​electrical or ​telephonewire or ​connection: Power lines were down after the ​storm. That line is ​busy – may I take a ​message?

line noun (PIPE)

[C] a ​system of ​pipes: a ​water/​gas line

line noun (RAILROAD)

[C] a ​trainroute, or a ​railroadtrack: rail/​commuter lines

line noun (COMPANY)

[C] a ​company that has an ​organizedsystem of ​transport by ​ship, ​truck, ​aircraft, or ​bus: a ​shipping line

line noun (WORDS)

[C] a ​row of words that ​formpart of a ​text: Limericks are ​humorous five-line ​poems. [C] A line is also a ​short written ​message: Drop me a line when you get a ​chance. [C] A line is also a ​remark that is ​intended to ​amuse, ​persuade, or ​deceive: He gave me some line about how his ​father is the ​mayor. [C] Lines are also the words that ​actorsspeak when ​performing.

line noun (DIRECTION)

[C usually sing] a ​direction or ​path: Fortunately, the ​pedestrian wasn’t in the line of ​fire.

line noun (WAY OF DEALING)

[C] a way of ​dealing with or ​thinking about something or someone: I couldn’t ​follow his line of ​reasoning.

line noun (JOB)

[C] a ​job, ​interest, or ​activity: "What line of ​work are you in?" "I’m a ​teacher."

line noun (GOODS)

[C] a ​type of ​goods: Our new swimwear line will be in ​storesshortly.

lineverb [T]

 us   /lɑɪn/

line verb [T] (COVER)

to ​cover the inside ​surface of an ​object with another ​material: I lined the ​kitchencabinets with ​shelfpaper.
(Definition of line from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "line" - British English Dictionary

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linenoun

uk   us   /laɪn/

line noun (LONG MARK)

A2 [C] a ​long, ​thinmark on the ​surface of something: a ​straight line Sign ​yourname on the ​dotted line. She was very ​old and her ​face was ​covered with lines. My ​legsfelt all ​wobbly when I ​stood up and I couldn't ​walk in a ​straight line (= ​walk without ​moving to the ​side while ​movingforward).
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line noun (ROW)

C2 [C] a ​group of ​people or things ​arranged in a ​row: a line of ​trees The ​prisonersformed a line against the ​wall. [C] US (UK queue) a ​group of ​peoplestanding one behind the other who are ​waiting for something: Just get in line and ​waityourturn like everyone ​else. I had to wait/​stand in line for three ​hours to get ​tickets.a long line of a ​series of ​people or things that ​follow each other in ​time: She is the ​latest in a ​long line of ​controversialleaders. He comes from a ​long line of ​doctors (= a lot of his ​relatives were ​doctors before him).
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line noun (DIVISION)

C2 [C] a ​long, ​thin and sometimes ​imaginarymark that ​forms the ​edge, ​border, or ​limit of something: That ​ball was ​definitely in! It was ​nowhere near the line! The ​police couldn't ​arrest him because he'd ​fledacross the state line. For many ​televisionviewers the dividing line between ​fact and ​fiction is ​becomingincreasinglyblurred.
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line noun (PHONE)

B2 [C] a ​connection to a ​phonesystem: I'm ​afraidyour line's been ​disconnected because ​your last ​bill hasn't been ​paid. If you ​want to ​airyouropinionslive on the ​radio, the lines will be ​open (= you can ​phone) from eight o'clock. I've got Chris Foster on the line for you. Do you ​want to take it now or ​call her back ​later?formal Please hold the line (= ​wait). I'll ​see if she's ​available.
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line noun (RAILWAY)

B1 [C] (the ​routefollowed by) a ​railwaytrack: The ​train was ​delayed, ​apparentlydue to ​leaves on the line. The ​Northern Line is the ​worst on the London Underground. Mainline ​services can be very ​quick, but ​travelling on the branch lines is much ​slower.
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line noun (APPROACH TO SUBJECT)

C2 [C] a way of ​dealing with or ​thinking about something or someone: The government's official line has always been to ​refuse to ​negotiate with ​terrorists. The ​courts should take a ​tougher line with (= ​punish more ​severely)sexoffenders. Several ​Labour MPs ​disagree with ​their party's line ontaxation. What ​sort of line (= ​method of ​arguing) do you ​think we should take in the ​paynegotiations? The ​police are ​confident that this new line of ​inquiry will ​lead them to the ​murderer. It ​seemsinevitable that the ​country will be divided alongethnic lines.line of reasoning, thinking, etc. C2 a way of ​thinking about a ​particularsubject: We cannot ​agree with ​their line of ​reasoning.
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line noun (MILITARY)

C2 [C] a ​row of ​positions used to ​defend against ​enemyattack, ​especially the ​onesclosest to ​enemypositions: They were taken ​prisoner while on a ​reconnaissancemission behind ​enemy lines.figurative In a ​game of ​football, the ​goalkeeper is the last line of ​defence.
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line noun (SHAPE)

[C] the ​shape of something that has been ​designed or ​created: They have a ​reputation for ​designingcars with ​elegantaerodynamic lines.

line noun (SUPPORT)

[C] a ​long, ​strong, ​thinpiece of ​material, such as ​string, ​rope, or ​wire, used to ​support something: I'd ​hung the ​washing out on the clothes line. Can you ​feel the ​fishtugging on the line?

line noun (COMPANY)

[C] a ​company that ​transportspeople or ​goods: a ​shipping line

line noun (REMARK)

[C] a ​remark that is ​intended to ​entertain, ​persuade, or ​deceive: a ​speechfull of ​memorable lines He ​keeps giving me that line about not being ​able to do any ​work because his ​computer is down. Who was it who came up with that ​famous line about "​lies, ​damnedlies and ​statistics?"

line noun (WORDS)

B1 [C] a ​row of words that ​formpart of a ​text: We could get more lines on the ​page if we ​reduced the ​typesize. The ​computerscreendisplays 80 ​charactersper line. [C usually plural] the words that an ​actorspeaks when ​performing in a ​film, ​play, etc.: I only had two lines in the ​wholeplay. She hasn't learned her lines ​yet, and we've got ​our first ​rehearsaltomorrow. I'm ​terrified of forgetting my lines.lines [plural] UK a ​punishment for ​schoolstudents in which a ​sentence has to be written ​repeatedly: She got 200 lines for ​swearing at her ​teacher.

line noun (MUSIC)

[C] a ​shortseries of ​musicalnotes

line noun (JOB)

[C usually singular] the ​type of ​job someone does: "What line of ​work are you in?" "I'm a ​teacher." You ​meet some very ​interestingpeople in my line of ​business.

line noun (GOODS)

C1 [C] a ​range of ​similar things that are for ​sale: There are ​discounts on many ​items from ​ourolder lines. I was ​shown all ​their new lines.

lineverb [T]

uk   us   /laɪn/

line verb [T] (FORM ROW)

C2 to ​form a ​row along the ​side of something: Thousands of ​people lined the streets to ​watch the ​presidentialprocessionpass by. Police lined the route of the ​demonstration. countrylanes lined withtrees

line verb [T] (COVER)

to ​cover the inside ​surface of something: I lined the ​drawers witholdwallpaper. How much would it ​cost to have this ​jacket lined? Full-length ​mirrors lined each ​wall of the ​bathroom.
(Definition of line from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "line" - Business English Dictionary

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linenoun [C]

uk   us   /laɪn/
COMMERCE a ​range of similar ​products: There are ​discounts on many ​items from our older lines. As with other ​books in this publisher's line, this one is written for a popular ​audience. I showed them all our new product lines.line of sth The company's spring line of handbags is wonderful.lines of bonds/stocks/shares The ​state is ​selling three lines of ​bonds.
PRODUCTION a ​system of making ​goods in which a ​worker repeatedly does the same ​tasks on every ​item and then ​passes it to the next ​worker: The first ​year they had me on the line putting wheels on Cadillacs.assembly/processing/production line Eight ​additionalproduction lines were ​installed in the town's only ​factory. a line ​foreman/​supervisor
COMMUNICATIONS a ​connection to a ​telephone or ​datasystem: I'm afraid your phone line has been ​disconnected. The company's first fibre-optic lines were ​installed in 1998. Keep the lines ​open in ​case the ​bosscalls with a ​final decision.on the line Mike Saunders is on the line for you.
a ​connection to a ​publicservice for water, ​liquidwaste, or electricity: Power ​transmission lines were out for three weeks after the hurricane. Interference from the electric lines caused the ​equipment to ​malfunction. Construction ​workersinstalled a water line where Walnut Avenue and First Street ​intersect.
a ​series of ​people that ​follow each other in ​time: He comes from a ​long line ofentrepreneurs.
a ​series of ​people in ​order of ​importance: the first/second, etc. in line He is second in line to take over the ​company.
someone's ​job, ​industry, or ​area of ​activity: "What line of ​work are you in?" "I'm a professor." You ​meet some very interesting ​people in my line of ​business.
BANKING a way of getting ​money: line of credit/revenue Your ​bank can ​raise your line of ​credit if you have a good ​paymenthistory.
a ​group of ​people or things ​arranged in a row: march/stand/wait in line If you don't like ​standing in line, do your ​part to make sure you're an ​efficientcustomer.
TRANSPORT a ​company that ​transportspeople or ​goods: a railway/shipping line The ​shipping line ​carried fewer ​containers last ​year
bring sth into line (with sth) to make something the same as or similar to something else: He'd like to ​bring the ​pay of an Army ​private into line with that of a ​police constable.
come/get/fall into line to ​start to ​officiallyagree with a ​plan or ​idea or to do something in the same way as other ​people, ​organizations, ​companies, etc.: We are considering ​legalaction if they do not come into line soon.
in the firing line (also in the line of fire) likely to receive criticism or to ​lose a ​job: Next in the ​environmentfiring line are the ​CEOs of the world's biggest ​chemicalcompanies. Jack put himself in the line of ​fire by ​talking to the ​press about our problems.
get sb in line to make someone ​agree to your way of doing something: If we have to ​changesupervisors to get everybody in line, we will. You better get your ​people in line, or you'll ​lose the ​battle for ​marketshare.
hold the line COMMUNICATIONS to ​keep a someone waiting on the ​telephone: Will you ​hold the line while I ​check my ​calendar? to continue to have an ​opinion, especially after a lot of argument: She must ​hold the line against this ​kind of criticism. to ​keep a ​price or ​amount of ​money at the same ​level: The ​aim of the ​currentadministration is to ​hold the line on ​taxes. The ​chancellor has ​agreed to ​hold the line on ​tuitioncosts for in-state ​students next ​year.
in line for sth likely to get something: American ​banks are first in line for the ​small, low-risk ​deals. Mortgage ​brokers could be next in line for a ​ban on ​commissions.
in line to do sth to have a very good chance of doing something: The water ​company is in line to make a 7% ​efficiency cost-saving on the ​project.
in line with sth similar to something or at the same ​level as something: The company's ​results are in line withstockmarket expectations. We are ​seeking a ​payrise that's in line with ​inflation.
on the line if something is on the line, it could easily be ​lost or destroyed: When it's your ​personal credibility on the line, it's best to ​stop making ​crude jokes in ​meetings. He put his ​career on the line when he went ​public about his employer's lies.
toe the line (US also toe the mark) to ​behave according to an ​officialrule, especially when you do not ​agree with it: The new guy is better ​salesman and will ​toe the ​marketing department's line much more closely.

lineverb [T]

uk   us   /laɪn/
line sb's pockets to make someone ​richer, especially in ​illegal or dishonest ways: They're the ​sort of Washington politicians who would line the ​pockets of their Wall Street friends. These are simply clutching, greedy ​people who are just ​manipulatingsociety at large to line their ​pockets.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of line from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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