look Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Definition of “look” - English Dictionary

"look" in American English

See all translations

lookverb

 us   /lʊk/
  • look verb (SEE)

[I] to ​directyoureyes in ​order to ​see: Come look at what I’ve ​found. She looked at her ​brother. He looked out (of) the ​window of the ​bus.
  • look verb (SEARCH)

[I always + adv/prep] to ​try to ​find something: Please ​help me look for my ​keys. We looked ​everywhere but couldn’t ​find it. I’ll look for a ​present for Tracy while I’m at the ​mall.
  • look verb (SEEM)

[L] to ​seem or ​appear to be: The ​roads look ​icy. That ​dress looks ​nice on you. He looked ​friendly. She looked like she hadn’t ​slept all ​night. He has ​started to look his ​age (= ​appear as ​old as he really is). It looks like (= It is ​likely that) we’ll be ​finished by ​January. It looks like ​snow (= It ​seemslikely to ​snow).
  • look verb (EXAMINE)

[I always + adv/prep] to ​examine or ​study, often ​quickly or ​informally: Would you look over these ​numbers to ​see if I’ve made a ​mistake? I don’t go there to ​shop – I just like to look around and ​see what they have.
  • look verb (FACE)

[I] to be in or ​view a ​particulardirection; ​face: The ​garden looks ​east. The ​porch looks out over the ​lake.

lookexclamation

 us   /lʊk/
  • look exclamation (GETTING ATTENTION)

used to get someone’s ​attention, often to ​expressanger or ​annoyance: Look, I’ve already told you that I’m not ​lending you any more ​money.

looknoun

 us   /lʊk/
  • look noun (SEEM)

[C] an ​expression of the ​face, or a ​particularappearance: a ​joyful/​sad look I didn’t like the look of the ​place and ​left as ​soon as I could. [pl] He had good looks and ​lots of ​money.
(Definition of look from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"look" in British English

See all translations

lookverb

uk   /lʊk/  us   /lʊk/
  • look verb (SEE)

A1 [I] to ​directyoureyes in ​order to ​see: Look! There's ​grandma. They looked at the ​picture and ​laughed. Look at all these ​toys on the ​floor. She looked up from her ​book and ​smiled at me. I looked out (of) the ​window. Look over there - there's a ​rainbow!

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • look verb (SEARCH)

A1 [I] to ​try to ​find something or someone: I'm looking for my ​keys. I looked ​everywhere, but I couldn't ​find my ​glasses. Have you looked in the ​dictionary? I looked down the ​list but couldn't ​see his ​name.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • look verb (SEEM)

A2 [L, I usually + adv/prep] to ​appear or ​seem: You look well! The ​roads look very ​icy. That ​dress looks ​nice on you. He has ​started to look his ​age (= ​appear as ​old as he really is). It's looking good (= things are going well). He looked (like) a ​friendlysort of ​person. The ​twins look just liketheirmother. She looked as if/though she hadn't ​slept all ​night. It looks likerain (= as if it is going to ​rain).

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • look verb (DIRECTION)

B2 [I usually + adv/prep] to ​face a ​particulardirection: The ​garden looks ​south. This ​window looks out onto the ​lake.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

looknoun

uk   /lʊk/  us   /lʊk/
  • look noun (WITH EYES)

B1 [C] the ​act of looking at someone or something: She gave him a look ofrealdislike. Take a (good) look at this ​picture and ​see if you ​recognize anyone. Can I have a look atyourdictionary?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • look noun (SEARCH)

B1 [C usually singular] the ​act of ​trying to ​find someone or something: I had another look for the ​watch, but couldn't ​find it.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • I had a look for the ​book.
  • Have a good look in the ​cupboard.
  • You've got ​nits? Let's have a look.
  • I can have a look for the ​papers for you.
  • We'll need to have a good look round before we ​leave.
  • look noun (APPEARANCE)

B2 [C] an ​expression on someone's ​face: She had a ​worried look about her. She gave me a ​questioning look.
C1 [C] a ​style or ​fashion: The look this ​year will be ​relaxed and ​casual.
the look of sb/sth
B2 the ​appearance of someone or something: They ​liked the look of the ​hotel, but it was too ​expensive. I don't like the look of that ​fence (= it ​appears to have something ​wrong with it).
sb's looks
C2 a person's ​appearance, ​especially how ​attractive they are: I like her looks. Her looks ​improved as she ​grewolder. He put on ​weight and ​started to lose his looks.

lookexclamation

uk   /lʊk/  us   /lʊk/
(Definition of look from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"look" in Business English

See all translations

lookverb [I]

uk   us   /lʊk/
be looking to do sth
to ​plan to do something: Many Hong Kong ​manufacturers are looking to ​expand in the UK ​market.
I'm just looking
said to a ​personworking in a ​store when they ​offer to ​help you, but you want to continue looking at the ​products: 'Do you need any ​help?' 'I'm just looking, thank you.'
look good
if something such as ​business, ​news, or a ​plan looks good, you ​think that it will ​succeed or that something good might ​happen: Margins are ​improving and the ​underlyingbusiness looks good. Strategically the ​deal looks good.
never look back
to continue to be ​successful after having an earlier ​success: He says: 'I ​applied, got the ​job, and have never looked back.'
(Definition of look from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of look?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“look” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

planet

an extremely large, round mass of rock and metal, such as Earth, or of gas, such as Jupiter, that moves in a circular path around the sun or another star

Word of the Day

trigger warning noun
trigger warning noun
May 02, 2016
a warning that a subject may trigger unpleasant emotions or memories This is not, I should stress, an argument that trigger warnings should become commonplace on campus.

Read More