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Definition of “love” - English Dictionary

"love" in American English

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loveverb

 us   /lʌv/
  • love verb (LIKE SOMEONE)

[T] to have a ​strongaffection for someone, which can be ​combined with a ​strongromanticattraction: Susan loved her ​brotherdearly. "I love you and ​want to ​marry you, Emily," he said.
  • love verb (LIKE SOMETHING)

to like something very much: [T] My ​kids love ​cartoons. [+ to infinitive] We’d love to own ​our own ​home.

lovenoun

 us   /lʌv/
  • love noun (LIKING SOMEONE)

fall in love
If you ​fall in love you ​begin to love someone: She’s ​fallen in love and made ​plans to ​marry.
[U] You can write love/love from/all my love/​lots of love before ​yourname at the end of ​letters to ​family and ​friends.
in love
A ​person who is in love is experiencing a ​romanticattraction for another ​person: I ​think he's in love with Anna.
(Definition of love from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"love" in British English

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loveverb [T]

uk   /lʌv/  us   /lʌv/
  • love verb [T] (LIKE SOMEONE)

A1 to like another ​adult very much and be ​romantically and ​sexuallyattracted to them, or to have ​strongfeelings of ​liking a ​friend or ​person in ​yourfamily: I love you. Last ​night he told me he loved me. I've only ​ever loved one man. I'm ​sure he loves his ​kids.

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  • love verb [T] (LIKE SOMETHING)

A1 to like something very much: She loves ​animals. I ​absolutely love ​chocolate. He really loves his ​job. [+ -ing verb] I love ​skiing. Love it or ​hate it, ​reality TV is here to ​stay.
would love
A2 used, often in ​requests, to say that you would very much like something: I'd love a ​cup of ​coffee if you're making one. [+ to infinitive] She would ​dearly love tostart her own ​business.UK I'd love you to come to ​dinner next ​week.US I'd love for you to come to ​dinner next ​week.

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lovenoun

uk   /lʌv/  us   /lʌv/
  • love noun (LIKING SOMEONE)

B1 [U] the ​feeling of ​liking another ​adult very much and being ​romantically and ​sexuallyattracted to them, or ​strongfeelings of ​liking a ​friend or ​person in ​yourfamily: "I've been ​seeing him over a ​year now." "Is it love?" Children need to be ​shownlots of love. "I'm ​seeing Laura next ​week." "Oh, ​please give her my love" (= ​tell her I am ​thinking about her with ​affection). Maggie ​asked me to send her love to you and the ​kids (= ​tell you that she is ​thinking about you with ​affection).informal How's ​your love life (= ​yourromantic and/or ​sexualrelationships) these ​days?
B1 [C] a ​person that you love and ​feelattracted to: He was the love of my ​life. She was my first love.
[as form of address] UK informal used as a ​friendlyform of ​address: You ​looktired, love. That'll be four ​poundsexactly, love.
A2 [U] informal (also love from, all my love) used before ​yourname at the end of ​letters, ​cards, etc. to ​friends or ​family: See you at ​Christmas. Love, Kate.
be in love
B1 to love someone in a ​romantic and ​sexual way: I'm in love for the first ​time and it's ​wonderful. They're still madly in love (with each other).
fall in love (with sb)
B1 to ​start to love someone ​romantically and ​sexually: I was 20 when I first ​fell in love.

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  • love noun (LIKING SOMETHING)

B2 [U] strongliking for: I don't ​share my boyfriend's love ofcooking.
B2 [C] something that you like very much: Music is one of her ​greatest loves.

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  • love noun (TENNIS)

[U] (in ​tennis) the ​state of having no ​points: The ​score now ​stands at 40–love.
(Definition of love from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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