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Definition of “man” - English Dictionary

"man" in American English

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mannoun

 us   /mæn/ (plural men  /men/ )
  • man noun (HUMAN MALE)

[C] an ​adultmalehuman being: a ​young man the men’s 400-meter ​race John can ​solve anything – the man’s a genius.
[C] A man is also a ​maleemployee without ​particularrank or ​title, or a ​member of the ​military who has a ​lowrank: The ​gascompanysent a man to ​fix the ​heatingsystem.
[C] infml Man is sometimes used when ​addressing an ​adultmalehuman being: Hey, man, got a ​light?
[C] infml Man is sometimes used as an ​exclamation, esp. when the ​speaker is ​expressing a ​strongemotion: Man, what a ​storm!
man and wife
When an ​official at a ​wedding says a man and a woman have ​become man and ​wife, it ​means they are now ​married to each other.
  • man noun (PERSON)

[C/U] the ​humanrace, or any ​member or ​group of it: [U] prehistoric man [U] This ​poison is one of the most ​dangeroussubstancesknown to man. [C] All men are ​equal in the ​sight of the ​law. Note: Some people dislike this use of man because it does not seem to give women equal importance with men. They prefer to use other words, such as humanity, humankind, people, and person.
  • man noun (PIECE)

[C] any of the ​pieces that are ​played with in ​games such as ​chess
manliness
noun [U]  us   /ˈmæn·li·nəs/
We no ​longerequateaggression with manliness.

manverb [T]

 us   /mæn/ (-nn-)
  • man verb [T] (OPERATE)

to be ​present in ​order to ​operate something, such as ​equipment or a ​service: Man the ​pumps! The ​phones are manned 24 ​hours a ​day. Note: Some people dislike this use of man because it does not seem to give women equal importance with men. They prefer to use other words, such as operate and staff.
(Definition of man from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"man" in British English

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mannoun

uk   /mæn/  us   /mæn/ (plural men uk   /men/ us   )
  • man noun (MALE)

A1 [C] an ​adultmalehuman being: a ​young/​tall man men and women the man in the ​greenjacket the men's ​champion in the 400 ​metres Steve can ​solve anything - the man's a ​genius.
[C] a ​maleemployee: The ​gascompany said they would ​send some men to ​fix the ​leak. The man from the ​newspaperwrote some ​positive things about the ​movie. Our man in Washington ​sent us the ​news by ​faxyesterday.
men
[plural] military malemembers of the ​armedforces who are not ​officers: The ​militaryexpedition was made up of 100 ​officers and men. He ​ordered his men to ​fire. One of the men is here to ​see you, ​sir.
[C] old-fashioned a ​maleservant: My man will show you to the ​door.
a marketing, advertising, etc. man
a man ​typical of or ​involved in ​marketing, ​advertising, etc.
[C] informal a ​husband or ​malesexualpartner: I ​hear she's got a new man. Is there a man in her ​life?
mainly US informal used when ​talking to someone, ​especially a man: Hey, man, how are you doing?
man and wife old-fashioned
If a man and a woman are man and ​wife, they are ​married to each other.
the man [S] US slang
a ​person or ​group that has ​power or ​authority, for ​example the ​police

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • man noun (PEOPLE)

B2 [U] the ​humanrace: Man is still ​far more ​intelligent than the ​smartestrobot. Man is ​rapidlydestroying the ​earth. This is one of the most ​dangeroussubstances known to man. Try to ​imagine what ​life must have been like for Neolithic man 10,000 ​years ago.
[C] literary or old-fashioned a ​person of either ​sex: All men are ​equal in the ​sight of the ​law.

manverb [T]

uk   /mæn/  us   /mæn/ (-nn-)
To man something such as a ​machine or ​vehicle is to be ​present in ​order to ​operate it: The ​phones are manned 24 ​hours a ​day. Barricades were ​erected against the ​advancinggovernmenttroops and they were manned ​throughout the ​night. Man the ​pumps! Note: Many people find this use sexist and prefer to use other verbs such as 'operate' or 'staff'.
Phrasal verbs

manexclamation

uk   /mæn/  us   /mæn/ informal

-mansuffix

uk   / -mæn/ /-mən/  us   / -mæn/  /-mən/
(Definition of man from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"man" in Business English

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mannoun [C]

uk   us   /mæn/ HR, WORKPLACE
a man who does a particular ​type of ​work: A man's coming to ​fix the ​photocopier later. Our man in Washington has this ​report on the ​election.an advertising/a marketing/an operations man They ​brought in a ​topsales and ​marketing man to ​help with the new ​productlaunch.
men in suits disapproving
men at the ​top of an ​organization who are interested in the ​financialperformance of a ​company rather than in the ​creative or ​productside of the ​business: a stuffy ​boardroomfilled with men in ​suits
officeworkers who are considered to be doing a boring ​job: The ​place was ​full of men in ​suits from an ​insurancecompany.

manverb [T]

uk   us   /mæn/ (-nn-) HR, WORKPLACE
to use or ​operateequipment or ​machinery as ​part of your ​work, or to ​work in a particular ​place: Extra ​staff are ​brought in to man the ​phonelines during ​busyperiods. All ​parts of the ​building, apart from toilets, are manned by ​securitystaff and ​covered by cameras.
See also
(Definition of man from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“man” in Business English

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