market Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “market” - English Dictionary

Definition of "market" - American English Dictionary

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marketnoun [C]

 us   /ˈmɑr·kɪt/

market noun [C] (AREA)

an ​openarea, ​building, or ​event at which ​peoplegather to ​buy and ​sellgoods or ​food

market noun [C] (DEMAND)

the ​demand for ​products or ​services: Are you ​sure there’s a market for something like this? A market is also an ​area or ​particulargroup that ​goods can be ​sold to: the ​teenage/​adult market domestic/​foreign markets A market is also the ​business or ​trade in a ​particulartype of ​goods or ​services: the ​job/​housing market

marketverb [T]

 us   /ˈmɑr·kɪt/

market verb [T] (ADVERTISE)

to ​advertise and ​offergoods for ​sale: It’s a ​product that will ​sell if we can ​find the ​right way to market it.
(Definition of market from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "market" - British English Dictionary

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marketnoun [C]

uk   /ˈmɑː.kɪt/  us   /ˈmɑːr-/

market noun [C] (BUYING AND SELLING)

C1 the ​people who might ​want to ​buy something, or a ​part of the ​world where something is ​sold: Are you ​sure there's a market for the ​product? We ​estimate the ​potential market for the new ​phones to be around one million ​people in this ​countryalone. The domestic market is still ​depressed, but ​demandabroad is ​picking up. They've ​increasedtheir share of the market by ten ​percent over the past ​year.C2 the ​business or ​trade in a ​particularproduct, ​includingfinancialproducts: the ​coffee market the ​economic market the commodities market the stock market the job market the housing marketin the market for sth interested in ​buying something: Thanks for the ​offer, but I'm not in the market for another ​carright now.on the market available for ​sale: We putourhouse on the market as ​soon as ​housepricesstarted to ​rise. This is one of the ​besttelevisions on the market. The ​pictures would ​sell for ​half a million on the open market (= if ​offered for ​sale without a ​fixedprice).
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market noun [C] (PLACE)

A2 a ​place or ​event at which ​peoplemeet in ​order to ​buy and ​sell things: Fruit and ​vegetables are much ​fresher from/at the market than in the ​supermarket. She ​runs a ​stall at the farmer's market. The ​flower market is a ​bigtouristattraction. a ​craft market Visit the ​area on market day for a ​glimpse of the ​real Paris.
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market noun [C] (SHOP)

US a ​shop that ​sellsmainlyfood

marketverb [T]

uk   /ˈmɑː.kɪt/  us   /ˈmɑːr-/
to make ​goodsavailable to ​buyers in a ​planned way that ​encouragespeople to ​buy more of them, for ​example by ​advertising: Their ​products are very ​cleverly marketed.
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marketer
noun [C] uk   /-kɪ.tər/  us   /-kɪ.t̬ɚ/
(Definition of market from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "market" - Business English Dictionary

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marketnoun

uk   us   /ˈmɑːkɪt/
[C] ECONOMICS, COMMERCE the ​business or ​activity of ​buying and ​selling a particular ​product or ​service: the car/coffee/telecoms, etc. market The ​telecoms market is ​evolving rapidly.the market in/for sth The ​battle for ​control of the London Stock Exchange ​aims to ​create a truly ​global market in ​shares. We need to ​increase our share of the market. Difficult market ​conditionscontributed to a 9% ​decline in first-half ​profits.the US/local/world market The ​companyclaims to ​hold half of the US market by ​volume. booming/​competitive/​buoyant markets depressed/​falling/​weak markets to break into/​capture/​enter the market
[C] COMMERCE a ​part of the ​world where something is or might be ​sold, or a particular ​group of ​people who ​buy or might ​buy something: Theemerging market where we see perhaps our ​strongestopportunity is China.create/find/open up a market The consoles are ​sold at the ​lowest possible ​price to ​create a market for ​profitable games.break into/enter/penetrate a market They've wanted to ​break into the market in Asia for some ​time.develop/expand/pursue markets We give the ​highestimportance to ​expanding markets for existing ​products.a changing/growing/expanding market Time-share ​companies have ​adapted their ​salespackages to a ​changing market. an export/​international/​overseas market the corporate/teenage/youth market market ​information/​assessment
[C] COMMERCE demand for a ​product or ​service, or the ​number of possible ​buyers for it: a market for sth Is there still a market for ​faxmachines since the advent of ​email?the domestic/global/world market The ​domestic market is still ​depressed.a big/large/growing market The ​subsidiescreated a ​big market for wind-turbine ​manufacturers in ​Europe.
the market [S] ECONOMICS an ​economicsystem in which ​prices, ​salaries, ​employment, etc. are decided by how much ​people want and will ​pay for ​goods and ​services: His ​policy on ​pricing was to ​let the market decide.
[C] (also financial market, also stock market) STOCK MARKET, FINANCE the ​activity of ​buying and ​sellingshares, ​bonds, commodities (= ​products that can be ​traded), ​currencies, etc., or a ​place where this is done: Some ​investorsgainunfairadvantage by ​changingorders after markets have ​closed. If the market ​rises by 20% over the ​year, it ​means that the firm's ​incomerisesautomatically by the same ​amount. Asian markets made ​stronggainsovernight.on a/the market On the Chicago market, a ​bushel of wheat ​fell to 262.50 ​cents from 271.75 ​cents. trading on foreign markets
[C] COMMERCE a ​place or ​event at which ​peoplemeet in ​order to ​buy and ​sell things: a ​covered/an outdoor/a street market a market ​stall/​trader
[C] US COMMERCE a ​store that ​sells mainly ​food: Can you ​stop at the market to ​buy some ​milk?
be first, etc. to market COMMERCE to be first, etc. to have a ​productready for ​sale: For some ​companies, being first to market is often more important than having the best ​product.
bring, get, etc. sth to market COMMERCE to arrive at the ​point where a ​product is ​ready to be ​sold: If all goes well, the ​company hopes to ​bring the ​product to market in about two ​years.
come/go to (the) market COMMERCE to ​offer a new ​product for ​sale for the first ​time, or to be ​offered for ​sale for the first ​time: The ​bigfoodprocessingcompanytestsingredients like cooking ​oil before they go to market. STOCK MARKET to begin ​sellingshares, etc. on a ​stockexchange, or to begin to be ​sold on a ​stockexchange: The ​company came to market in July, ​hitting a ​closingpeak of 247p this week. We expect the ​company to be ​valued at about £80m when the ​shares come to market on May 22.
corner the market (in/on sth) COMMERCE to be more ​successful than any other ​company at ​selling a particular ​type of ​product: They have cornered the market in ​cheapflights.
get to market COMMERCE if a ​product gets to market, it is ​ready to be ​sold: Better ​drugs can always get to market, ensuring patients ​access to the best ​medicine.
in the market for sth interested in ​buying something: Consumers in the market for a new ​car may ​turn to more ​fuel-efficientoptions.
make a market STOCK MARKET to ​deal in ​shares, ​bonds, etc. (= ​buy and ​sell them for others), so that ​buyers do not have to ​findsellers directly: Most of the ​maindealingbanks will make markets only with ​realinvestors, not ​traders.
on/onto the market COMMERCE available to be ​bought: They put their ​house on the market, but it hasn't ​sold. This is the best ​mortgagerateavailable on the market at the ​presenttime. The ​number of ​properties coming onto the market also remained little ​changed.
play the market FINANCE, STOCK MARKET to ​riskmoneybuying and ​sellingshares, etc.: He had an instinct for ​finance, ​subscribed to the Wall Street Journal, and played the market.
price yourself/sb/sth out of the market COMMERCE to ​charge so much for a ​product or ​service that nobody ​wants or is able to ​buy it: There are ​concerns that London is ​pricing itself out of the market as a ​Europeanbusinessbase. Sharp ​rises in ​houseprices in recent ​years are ​increasinglypricing many ​people out of the market.

marketverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈmɑːkɪt/ MARKETING, COMMERCE
to ​offerproducts for ​sale to ​buyers: The two ​companies have ​formed a ​partnership to ​jointly market the ​range of ​drugs.
to encourage ​people to ​buy more of a particular ​product, for ​example by ​advertising: market sth as sth Food marketed as ​lower fat has been proved to ​lull us into a ​false sense of ​security.market sth to sb The tobacco ​companies say they do not market their ​products to children. The ​company has to ​modernize how it markets its chocolate, taking into ​accountparentconcerns about obesity and high-sugar snacks.
(Definition of market from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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