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Definition of “match” - English Dictionary

"match" in American English

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matchnoun

 us   /mætʃ/
  • match noun (COMPETITION)

[C] a ​sportscompetition or ​event in which two ​people or ​teamscompete against each other: a ​tennis/​wrestling match fig. They got into a ​shouting/​shoving match (= they were ​arguing or ​fighting).
  • match noun (STICK)

[C] a ​short, ​thinstick of ​wood or ​cardboard, ​covered at one end with a ​material that will ​burn when ​rubbed against a ​roughsurface

matchverb [I/T]

 us   /mætʃ/
  • match verb [I/T] (BE SUITABLE)

to be ​similar to or the same as something, or to ​combine well with someone or something ​else: [I] The ​shirt and ​pants match ​perfectly. [T] Her ​fingerprints matched the ​prints that were taken from the ​crimescene.
  • match verb [I/T] (BE EQUAL)

to be ​equal to another ​person or thing in some ​quality: [T] It would be ​difficult to match the ​service this ​airline gives ​itscustomers.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of match from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"match" in British English

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matchnoun

uk   us   /mætʃ/
  • match noun (COMPETITION)

A2 [C] mainly UK (US usually game) a ​sportscompetition or ​event in which two ​people or ​teamscompete against each other: a ​tennis match a ​football/​cricket match We ​won/​lost the match. Liverpool have a match with (= against) Blackburn next ​week.
the man/woman of the match UK
the ​person who has ​scored the most ​points or ​played the ​best in a match

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  • match noun (STICK)

B2 [C] a ​short, ​thinstick made of ​wood or ​cardboard and ​covered with a ​specialchemical at one end that ​burns when ​rubbedfirmly against a ​roughsurface: a box of matches You should always strike a match away from you.
put a match to sth UK
to make something ​burn

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  • match noun (SUITABLE)

C2 [S] something that is ​similar to or ​combines well with something ​else: The ​curtainslookgreat - they're aperfect match for the ​sofa.
[S] If two ​people who are having a ​relationship are a good match, they are very ​suitable for each other: Theirs is a match made in ​heaven (= a very good ​relationship).

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matchverb

uk   us   /mætʃ/
  • match verb (EQUAL)

C1 [T] to be as good as someone or something ​else: It would be ​difficult to match the ​service this ​airline gives ​itscustomers.

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  • match verb (LOOK SIMILAR)

B1 [I or T] If two ​colours, ​designs, or ​objects match, they are ​similar or ​lookattractive together: Do you ​think these two ​colours match? Does this ​shirt match these ​trousers? a ​sofa with ​curtains to match
  • match verb (CHOOSE)

B1 [T] to ​choose someone or something that is ​suitable for a ​particularperson, ​activity, or ​purpose: In the first ​exercise you have to match each ​capitalcity to ​itscountry.
(Definition of match from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"match" in Business English

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matchverb

uk   us   /mætʃ/
[T] to be ​equal to another ​person or thing in ​quality, ​amount, or ​level: Few ​people can match his ​combination of ​skills. Results this ​year may not match last year's. I'm looking for a ​job that matches my ​qualifications and ​ambitions.
[I or T] to be the same as something else, or to be the same as each other: The ​programautomaticallyfindswebsites and ​news stories that match your ​interests. His ​actions and his words did not match.
[T] to ​find something that is the same as something else, or goes well with it: match sth against sth Bring a ​sample of the colour you want to our ​store, and we will match it against one of our paint colours.match sth/sb to sth We can ​help you match the ​person to the ​job.
[T] to give or ​offer the same ​amount of ​money as has been given, ​collected, or ​offered by someone else: It's hard for ​smallstores to match ​supermarketprices. The ​charity will receive ​federalmoney to match the first $250 of each ​contribution.

matchnoun

uk   us   /mætʃ/
[C] something that is the same as something else: I ​searched for his ​name in the ​database but got the ​message "No match".find/make a match Detectives ​found a match with ​samples taken from the ​crime scene. I compared the two ​signatures, and they were an exact match.
[S] a ​person or thing that is ​equal to another ​person or thing in ​quality or ​power: a match for sb/sth The newspaper's new ​head is certainly a match for the previous ​editor.
be no match for sth/sb
to be less powerful or ​effective than someone or something else: Their ​computerfirewall was no match for the ​hackers.
(Definition of match from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“match” in Business English

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