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Definition of “material” - English Dictionary

"material" in American English

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materialnoun

 us   /məˈtɪr·i·əl/
  • material noun (PHYSICAL THING)

[C] a ​type of ​physical thing, such as ​wood, ​stone, or ​plastic, having ​qualities that ​allow it to be used to make other things: a hard/​soft material The ​sculpture was made of ​various materials, ​includingsteel, ​copperwire, and ​rubber.
  • material noun (CLOTH)

[C/U] cloth that can be used to make ​clothes, ​curtains, etc.: [U] What ​kind of material are you going to use for the ​curtains?
  • material noun (SUPPLIES)

[C/U] equipment or ​suppliesneeded for a ​particularactivity: [C usually pl] The ​money will be ​spent on ​educational materials.
  • material noun (INFORMATION)

[C/U] information used when writing something such as a ​book, or ​informationproduced to ​helppeople or to ​advertiseproducts: [U] He is ​working in the ​librarygathering material for the ​article he is writing.
(Definition of material from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"material" in British English

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materialnoun

uk   /məˈtɪə.ri.əl/  us   /-ˈtɪr.i-/
  • material noun (PHYSICAL SUBSTANCE)

B2 [C] a ​physicalsubstance that things can be made from: building materials, such as ​stone Crude ​oil is used as the raw (= ​basic) material for making ​plastics.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • material noun (INFORMATION)

B1 [C or U] information used when writing something such as a ​book, or ​informationproduced in ​variousforms to ​helppeople or to ​advertiseproducts: I'm in the ​process of collecting material for an ​article that I'm writing.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • material noun (CLOTH)

B1 [C or U] cloth that can be used to make things such as ​clothes: How much material will you need to make the ​skirt?

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • material noun (EQUIPMENT)

materials B1 [plural] equipment that you need for a ​particularactivity: "Do we need any writing materials?" "Only a ​pen and a ​pencil." teaching materials

materialadjective

uk   /məˈtɪə.ri.əl/  us   /-ˈtɪr.i-/
(Definition of material from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"material" in Business English

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materialnoun

uk   us   /məˈtɪəriəl/
[C or U] a ​physical substance that things can be made from: The ​cost of labour and materials has ​risen up to 40% in a ​shortperiod.building/construction materials The ​buildings also use ​recycledbuilding materials and ​consume less water.traditional/natural/recycled materials There is ​increasingdemand for ​products made from ​recycled materials. hazardous/​toxic/radioactive material
[U or plural] printeddocuments, ​books, ​computerprograms, etc. that give ​information, especially ones intended for a particular ​purpose: publicity/marketing/promotional material According to their ​publicity material, the new ​rates are the ​lowest in the UK.teaching/training materials The ​video and other ​training materials were ​createdin-house.printed/published material Some ​people prefer to receive ​informationface-to-face, rather than through ​published material.
[U] information used when writing something: She gave me a lot of useful material for my ​presentation. The journalist had been collecting material for an ​article on the ​President.

materialadjective [before noun]

uk   us   /məˈtɪəriəl/
relating to ​physicalobjects or ​money: Increased material ​wealth is ​delivered by today's ​economicsystem. He cares more about ​jobsatisfaction than material things.
(Definition of material from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“material” in Business English

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