might Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “might” - English Dictionary

Definition of "might" - American English Dictionary

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might

 us   /mɑɪt/

might (MAY)

past simple of may

mightmodal verb

 us   /mɑɪt/ (present tense might)

might modal verb (POSSIBILITY)

used to ​express the ​possibility that something will ​happen or be done or is ​true, ​although it may not be very ​likely: We might come ​visit you in Atlanta in the ​spring. He’s very ​fast and he might ​evenfinish in the ​top three. The Beach Boys might well have been the most ​talentedact to ​perform at the Monterey Pop Festival.

might modal verb (SUGGESTION)

used to make a ​suggestion or ​suggest a ​possibility in a ​polite way: I ​thought you might like to ​join me for ​dinner.

might modal verb (SHOULD)

used to ​suggest, esp. ​angrily, what someone should do to be ​pleasant or ​polite: You might at least ​try to ​look like you’re ​enjoying yourself!

mightnoun [U]

 us   /mɑɪt/

might noun [U] (POWER)

power, ​strength, or ​force: She ​struggled with all her might to ​lift the ​rock.
(Definition of might from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "might" - British English Dictionary

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mightmodal verb

uk   us   /maɪt/

might modal verb (MAY)

past simple of the ​verb may, used ​especially when ​reporting what someone has said, ​thought, ​asked, etc.: I ​brought him some ​sandwiches because I ​thought he might be ​hungry. Very ​politely the little ​boyasked if he might have another ​piece of ​cake (= he said "May I have another ​piece of ​cake, ​please?").
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might modal verb (POSSIBILITY)

A2 used to ​express the ​possibility that something will ​happen or be done, or that something is ​truealthough not very ​likely: I might come and ​visit you next ​year, if I can ​save enough ​money. Don't go any ​closer - it might be ​dangerous/it might not be ​safe. Driving so ​fast, he might have had a ​nastyaccident (= it could have ​happened but it did not). The ​rain might havestopped by now.
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might modal verb (PERMISSION)

mainly UK formal US old-fashioned used as a more ​politeform of may when ​asking for ​permission: Might I ​ask a ​question? I ​wonder if I might have a ​quicklook at ​yournewspaper?
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might modal verb (SUGGESTION)

C1 used to make a ​suggestion or ​suggest a ​possibility in a ​polite way: You might ​try a little more ​basil in the ​sauce next ​time. I ​thought you might ​want to ​join me for ​dinner.
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might modal verb (SHOULD)

used to ​suggest, ​especiallyangrily, what someone should do to be ​pleasant, ​correct, ​polite, etc.: You might at least ​try to ​look like you're ​enjoying yourself! "I ​asked my ​boss over for ​dinnertonight." "Well, you might haveasked me first!"

might modal verb (INTRODUCE)

(also may) used to ​introduce a ​statement that is very different from the ​statement you really ​want to make, in ​order to ​compare the two: The ​amount you ​save might be ​small, but it's still ​worth doing.

mightnoun [U]

uk   us   /maɪt/
power, ​strength, or ​force: Pizarro ​defeated the might of the Inca Empire with only a few hundred men. She ​struggled with all her might to get ​free.
(Definition of might from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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