mobile Definition in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Definition of “mobile” - English Dictionary

Definition of "mobile" - American English Dictionary

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mobileadjective

 us   /ˈmoʊ·bəl/
able to move ​easily or be ​easily moved: The ​Marines are a ​highly mobile ​force and can get ​anywherefast.

mobilenoun [C]

 us   /ˈmoʊ·bil/
a ​decoration or ​work of ​art that has ​parts that move in the ​air, often because each one is ​hung by a ​thread: We ​hung a mobile over the baby’s ​crib, and she ​loves to ​look at it when it moves.
(Definition of mobile from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "mobile" - British English Dictionary

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mobileadjective

uk   /ˈməʊ.baɪl/  us   /ˈmoʊ.bəl/

mobile adjective (MOVING)

[not usually before noun] moving or ​walking around ​freely: You've ​brokenyourankle but you'll be ​fully mobile within a ​couple of ​months. It's ​important to ​keep the ​joint mobile while it ​heals. able to be ​moved from one ​place to another: He uses a mobile ​laboratory. a mobile ​medicalunit
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mobile adjective (TECHNOLOGY)

used to ​describe a ​serviceavailable on a mobile ​phone, ​smallcomputer, etc.: mobile ​computing

mobilenoun [C]

uk   /ˈməʊ.baɪl/  us   /ˈmoʊ.bəl/

mobile noun [C] (PHONE)

A1 mainly UK (US usually cell phone) a mobile phone a mobile number : My mobile's 07796 10253.

mobile noun [C] (DECORATION)

a ​decoration or ​work of ​art that has many ​parts that ​movefreely in the ​air, for ​examplehanging from ​threads
(Definition of mobile from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Definition of "mobile" - Business English Dictionary

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mobileadjective

uk   /ˈməʊbaɪl/  us   /ˈməʊbəl/
ECONOMICS able or ​free to ​change your ​situation, for ​example by doing different ​work, becoming ​part of a different ​socialclass, or ​moving to a different ​place: It is one of the least socially mobile countries in ​Europe. With traditional ​employmentcontracts, ​companiesbenefit from a ​cheaper, less mobile ​workforce.
able to ​move or be ​transported easily from one ​place to another, or be used for a different ​purpose: Our ​masternetworkcenter is fully mobile in ​case of ​emergency. Forty ​years ago, ​manufacturing reigned supreme and ​capital wasn't mobile.
IT, COMMUNICATIONS related to a ​serviceavailable on a ​phone or ​computer used while ​travelling from ​place to ​place, without being ​connected by ​wires: Over half of the country's ​e-commerce is now ​conducted on mobile ​devices.mobile computing/network/telephony We are ​building the new ​system to ​address the ​increasing use of mobile ​computingdevices.

mobilenoun [C]

uk   /ˈməʊbaɪl/  us   /ˈməʊbəl/ UK (US usually cell phone, cell) IT, COMMUNICATIONS
a mobile ​phone: He ​left his mobile on the ​train. Let me give you my mobile ​number.on/from a mobile I ​think she was ​calling from her mobile.mobile handset/network/unit The mobile ​handset will be the first to use the new ​operatingsystem.mobile charges/sales Your mobile ​charges will be ​higher if you ​call from abroad.mobile company/maker/operator Mobile ​operators are fighting to be the ​leader of the ​handheldcomputingrevolution.
(Definition of mobile from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“mobile” in Business English

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