Definition of “monitor” - English Dictionary

“monitor” in British English

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monitornoun [ C ]

uk /ˈmɒn.ɪ.tər/ us /ˈmɑː.nə.t̬ɚ/

monitor noun [ C ] (PERSON WHO WATCHES)

B2 a person who has the job of watching or noticing particular things:

United Nations monitors were not allowed to enter the area.

More examples

monitor noun [ C ] (SCREEN)

B2 a computer screen or a device with a screen on which words or pictures can be shown:

a computer monitor
a TV monitor
Doctors watched the old man's heartbeat on a monitor.

monitor noun [ C ] (AT SCHOOL)

a child in school who has special jobs to do:

the library monitor

monitorverb [ T ]

uk /ˈmɒn.ɪ.tər/ us /ˈmɑː.nə.t̬ɚ/

(Definition of “monitor” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

“monitor” in American English

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monitornoun [ C ]

us /ˈmɑn·ɪ·t̬ər/

monitor noun [ C ] (SCREEN)

a device with a screen on which words or pictures can be shown:

a computer monitor

monitor noun [ C ] (WATCHER)

a person who has the job of watching or checking particular things, or a machine that regularly tests or records things:

United Nations monitors were prevented from entering the area.
A fetal monitor records an unborn baby’s heartbeat.

In school, a monitor is a student with special duties who helps the teacher:

the attendance monitor

monitorverb [ T ]

us /ˈmɑn·ɪ·t̬ər/

monitor verb [ T ] (WATCH)

to watch and check something carefully over a period of time:

They hired an accountant to help monitor cash flow.
The nurse is monitoring his heart rate and respiration.

(Definition of “monitor” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

“monitor” in Business English

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monitornoun [ C ]

uk /ˈmɒnɪtər/ us

IT a computer screen:

Adjust your monitor if the colour does not appear quite right.

LAW a person or organization whose job is to make certain that something is done properly or honestly:

The process will be watched closely during the next three years by an independent monitor.

IT a machine that regularly watches or tests and records something:

The acoustical monitor will collect real-time data and filter out non-whale noises.
a surveillance monitor
a blood pressure/heart monitor

monitorverb [ T ]

uk /ˈmɒnɪtər/ us

to watch a situation carefully for a period of time in order to discover something about it:

The government had agreed to allow the inspectors to monitor the refuelling process.
Police froze his bank accounts and monitored his ATM card in case he tried to make a transaction.
Comings and goings are monitored by security cameras.

(Definition of “monitor” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)