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Definition of “motion” - English Dictionary

"motion" in American English

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motionnoun

 us   /ˈmoʊ·ʃən/
  • motion noun (MOVEMENT)

[C/U] the ​act or ​process of ​moving, or a ​particularmovement: [U] His ​range of motion was ​exactlyequal on both ​sides. [C] She moved her ​finger in a ​circular motion.
  • motion noun (FORMAL REQUEST)

[C] a ​formalrequest, usually one made, ​discussed, and ​voted on at a ​meeting: [+ to infinitive] Someone made a motion to ​increase the ​membershipfee.
[C] A motion is also a ​request made to a ​judge in ​court for something to ​happen.
in motion
Something in motion is ​moving or ​operating or has ​started: The ​alarmrang and ​suddenly everyone was in motion. The governor’s ​request set in motion the ​process for ​receivingfederalfunds.

motionverb [always + adv/prep]

 us   /ˈmoʊ·ʃən/
to make a ​signal to someone, usually with ​yourhand or ​head: [T] He motioned me to ​sit down. [I] I ​saw him motion to the man at the ​door.
(Definition of motion from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)







"motion" in British English

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motionnoun

uk   /ˈməʊ.ʃən/  us   /ˈmoʊ.ʃən/
  • motion noun (MOVEMENT)

C2 [C or U] the ​act or ​process of ​moving, or a ​particularaction or ​movement: The ​violent motion of the ​shipupset his ​stomach. He ​rocked the ​cradle with a ​gentlebackwards and ​forwards motion. They ​showed the ​goal again in ​slow motion (= at a ​slowerspeed so that the ​action could be more ​clearlyseen).
[C] UK a ​polite way of referring to the ​process of getting ​rid of ​solidwaste from the ​body, or the ​waste itself: The ​nurseasked if her motions were ​regular.

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  • motion noun (SUGGESTION)

C2 [C] a ​formalsuggestion made, ​discussed, and ​voted on at a ​meeting: [+ to infinitive] Someone proposed a motion toincrease the ​membershipfee to $500 a ​year. The motion was accepted/​passed/​defeated/​rejected.

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motionverb [I or T, usually + adv/prep]

uk   /ˈməʊ.ʃən/  us   /ˈmoʊ.ʃən/
to make a ​signal to someone, usually with ​yourhand or ​head: I ​saw him motion to the man at the ​door, who ​quietlyleft. Her ​family all ​gathered around her, but she motioned them away. [+ obj + to infinitive ] He motioned me tosit down.
(Definition of motion from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"motion" in Business English

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motionnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈməʊʃən/ MEETINGS
a ​formal suggestion made, discussed, and ​voted on at a ​meeting: introduce/make/propose a motion They will ​propose a motion to ​move the ​vote to the evening of June 9. approve/carry/pass a motion The ​group unanimously ​passed a motion ​endorsing the ​designs. defeat/​reject a motion put ​forward/​table/​adopt a motion
(Definition of motion from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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